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Dionysiaca

Author: Nonnus, of Panopolis.; W H D Rouse
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1940.
Series: Loeb classical library, 344, 354, 356.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Nonnos of Panopolis in Egypt, who lived in the fifth century of our era, composed the last great epic poem of antiquity. The Dionysiaca, in 48 books, has for its chief theme the expedition of Dionysus against the Indians; but the poet contrives to include all the adventures of the god (as well as much other mythological lore) in a narrative which begins with chaos in heaven and ends with the apotheosis of Ariadne's  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Poetry
Translations
Translations into English
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Nonnus, of Panopolis.
Dionysiaca.
Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press; London, W. Heinemann, 1940-42
(OCoLC)586064174
Online version:
Nonnus, of Panopolis.
Dionysiaca.
Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press; London, W. Heinemann, 1940-42
(OCoLC)607839483
Named Person: Dionysus, (Greek deity)
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Nonnus, of Panopolis.; W H D Rouse
ISBN: 0674993799 [v.1] 9780674993792 [v.1] 0674993918 [v.2] 9780674993914 [v.2] 0674993934 [v.3] 9780674993938 [v.3
OCLC Number: 685107
Language Note: Greek and English.
Notes: Frontispiece accompanied by guard sheet with descriptive letterpress.
Description: 3 v. : ill. ; 17 cm.
Contents: Vol 1. General Introduction ; Mythological Introduction ; Recent text criticism of the Dionysiaca Editions ; Bibliography ; Summary of the books of the poem ; Text and translation Book I ; Additional note to book I ; Book II Additional note to book II ; Book III ; Book IV ; Book V ; Book VI Additional note to book VI ; Book VII ; Book VIII ; Book IX ; Book X ; Book XI ; Book XII Additional note to book XII ; Book XIII ; Book XIV ; Book XV --
Vol 2. Summary of the books of the poem ; Text and translation Book XVI ; Book XVII ; Book XVIII ; Book XIX ; Book XX ; Book XXI ; Book XXII ; Book XXIII ; Book XXIV ; Book XXV ; Book XXVI ; Book XXV ; Book XXVI ; Book XXVII ; Book XXVIII ; Book XXIX ; Book XXX ; Book XXXI ; Book XXXII ; Book XXXIII ; Book XXXIV ; Book XXXV --
Vol 3. Preface ; Summary of the books of the poem ; Text and translation Book XXXVI ; Book XXXVII ; Book XXXVIII ; Book XXXIX ; Book XL ; Additional note to book XL ; Book XLI ; Book XLII ; Book XLIII Book XLIV ; Book XLV ; Book XLVI ; Book XLVII ; Book XLVIII ; Index.
Series Title: Loeb classical library, 344, 354, 356.
Other Titles: Dionysiaca.
Responsibility: Nonnos ; with an English translation by W.H.D. Rouse ; mythological introduction and notes by H.J. Rose and notes on text criticism by L.R. Lind.

Abstract:

Nonnos of Panopolis in Egypt, who lived in the fifth century of our era, composed the last great epic poem of antiquity. The Dionysiaca, in 48 books, has for its chief theme the expedition of Dionysus against the Indians; but the poet contrives to include all the adventures of the god (as well as much other mythological lore) in a narrative which begins with chaos in heaven and ends with the apotheosis of Ariadne's crown. The wild ecstasy inspired by the god is certainly reflected in the poet's style, which is baroque, extravagant, and unrestrained. It seems that Nonnos was in later years converted to Christianity, for in marked contrast to the Dionysiaca, a poem dealing unreservedly with classical myths completely redolent of a pagan outlook, there is extant and ascribed to him a hexameter paraphrase of St. John's Gospel.

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Linked Data


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