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Dirty, sacred rivers : confronting South Asia's water crisis

Auteur : Cheryl Gene Colopy
Éditeur : New York : Oxford University Press, ©2012.
Édition/format :   Livre : AnglaisVoir toutes les éditions et tous les formats
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
Dirty, Sacred Rivers explores South Asia's increasingly urgent water crisis, taking readers on a journey through North India, Nepal and Bangladesh, from the Himalaya to the Bay of Bengal. The book shows how rivers, traditionally revered by the people of the Indian subcontinent, have in recent decades deteriorated dramatically due to economic progress and gross mismanagement. Dams and ill-advised embankments strangle  Lire la suite...
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Détails

Format : Livre
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : Cheryl Gene Colopy
ISBN : 9780199845019 0199845018
Numéro OCLC : 778827785
Description : xiii, 400 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Contenu : Dirty, sacred rivers --
The real poop: how rivers become sewers --
Delhi's Yamuna --
Melting ice rivers --
The shrinking third Pole --
In the valley of Dhunge Dhara --
Melamchi River blues --
More river blues --
Belji of Dhulikhel --
The sorrows of Bihar --
The Koshi's revenge --
The engineers --
The Garland --
Susu --
Beyond barrages and boundaries --
Poisoned blessings --
Where the rivers end.
Responsabilité : Cheryl Colopy.
Plus d’informations :

Résumé :

One journalist's account of her 7-year journey through the Ganges river basin to explore the revered, yet highly polluted, rivers of South Asia.  Lire la suite...

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Renewable Natural Resources Foundation 2013 Excellence in Journalism Award"Colopy offers a whirlwind tour both beautiful and troubling.... [she] interacts as a Westerner in the South Asian world with Lire la suite...

 
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