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Discipline and punish : the birth of the prison

Author: Michel Foucault; Alan Sheridan
Publisher: Harmondsworth, Middlesex : Penguin Books, 1991, 1977.
Series: Penguin social sciences
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Before the early 19th century, European ideas of crime and punishment tended to involve very public displays of the power of the monarch and the power of the state against the offending individual. Nowhere was this tendency more evident than in the spectacle of public executions. Those convicted of murder, piracy, counterfeiting, or other notable capital crimes would be taken to a public place for hanging or  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Michel Foucault; Alan Sheridan
ISBN: 014013722X 9780140137224
OCLC Number: 45870209
Language Note: Translation of 'Surveiller et punir, naissance de la prison', Gallimard, 1975.
Description: 333 pages, [8] leaves of plates : illustrations ; 20 cm.
Contents: Part I: Torture. 1. The body of the condemned --
2. The spectacle of the scaffold ---
Part II: Punishment. 1. Generalized punishment --
2. The gentle way in punishment ---
Part III: Discipline. 1. Docile bodies --
2. The means of correct training --
3. Panopticism ---
Part IV. Prison. 1. Complete and austere institutions --
2. Illegalities and delinquency --
3. The carceral.
Series Title: Penguin social sciences
Other Titles: Surveiller et punir.
Responsibility: Michel Foucault ; translated from the French by Alan Sheridan.

Abstract:

Foucault shows the development of the Western system of prisons, police organizations, administrative and legal hierarchies for social control - and the growth of disciplinary society as a whole.  Read more...

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