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Disciplining women : Alpha Kappa Alpha, Black counterpublics, and the cultural politics of Black sororities Preview this item
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Disciplining women : Alpha Kappa Alpha, Black counterpublics, and the cultural politics of Black sororities

Author: Deborah Elizabeth Whaley
Publisher: Albany : SUNY Press, ©2010.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Black Greek-letter organizations offer many African Americans opportunities for activism, community-building, fostering cultural pride, and cultural work within the African American community. This book focuses on the oldest Black Greek-letter sorority, Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA), established in 1908. In this innovative interdisciplinary analysis of AKA, Deborah Elizabeth Whaley combines ethnographic fieldwork,  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Deborah Elizabeth Whaley
ISBN: 9781438432731 1438432739 9781438432724 1438432720
OCLC Number: 522429295
Description: xii, 206 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Stomp the yard, School Daze, and the cultural politics of Black greek-letter organizations --
Alpha Kappa Alpha, Black counterpublics, and the ambiguity of social reform --
Stepping into the African diaspora: Alpha Kappa Alpha and the production of sexuality and femininity in sorority step performance --
Disciplining women, respectable pledges, and the meaning of a soror: Alpha Kappa Alpha and the transformation of the pledge process --
Voices of collectivity/agents of change: Alpha Kappa Alpha and the future of Black counterpublics --
Conclusion: Sorority sisters.
Responsibility: Deborah Elizabeth Whaley.

Abstract:

Black Greek-letter organizations offer many African Americans opportunities for activism, community-building, fostering cultural pride, and cultural work within the African American community. This book focuses on the oldest Black Greek-letter sorority, Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA), established in 1908. In this innovative interdisciplinary analysis of AKA, Deborah Elizabeth Whaley combines ethnographic fieldwork, archival research, oral history, and interpretive readings of popular culture and sorority rituals to examine the role of the Black sorority in women's everyday lives and more broadly within public life and politics. The study includes sorority members' stories of key cultural practices and rituals, including political participation, step dancing, pledging, hazing, and community organizing. While she remains critical of the shortcomings that plague many Black social organizations with activist programs, Whaley shows how AKA's calculated cultivation of sorority life demonstrates personal and group-directed discipline and illuminates how cultural practices intersect with politics and Black public life. -- from Back Cover.
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