skip to content
Dissociation and the fragmentary nature of traumatic memories: overview and exploratory study.
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Dissociation and the fragmentary nature of traumatic memories: overview and exploratory study.

Author: van der Kolk BA Affiliation: HRI Trauma Center, Brookline, Massachusetts 02146, USA.; R Fisler
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Journal of traumatic stress, 1995 Oct; 8(4): 505-25
Database:From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
Other Databases: ArticleFirst
Summary:
Since trauma arises from an inescapable stressful event that overwhelms people's coping mechanisms, it is uncertain to what degree the results of laboratory studies of ordinary events are relevant to the understanding of traumatic memories. This paper reviews the literature on differences between recollections of stressful and of traumatic events. It then reviews the evidence implicating dissociation as the central  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

More like this

 

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving;

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: van der Kolk BA Affiliation: HRI Trauma Center, Brookline, Massachusetts 02146, USA.; R Fisler
ISSN:0894-9867
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 121366565
Awards:

Abstract:

Since trauma arises from an inescapable stressful event that overwhelms people's coping mechanisms, it is uncertain to what degree the results of laboratory studies of ordinary events are relevant to the understanding of traumatic memories. This paper reviews the literature on differences between recollections of stressful and of traumatic events. It then reviews the evidence implicating dissociation as the central pathogenic mechanism that gives rise to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A systematic exploratory study of 46 subjects with PTSD indicated that traumatic memories were retrieved, at least initially, in the form of dissociated mental imprints of sensory and affective elements of the traumatic experience: as visual, olfactory, affective, auditory, and kinesthetic experiences. Over time, subjects reported the gradual emergence of a personal narrative that can be properly referred to as "explicit memory." The implications of these findings for understanding the nature of traumatic memories are discussed.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

All user tags (1)

View most popular tags as: tag list | tag cloud

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.