skip to content
The divine comedy Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The divine comedy

Author: Dante Alighieri; John Aitken Carlyle; Philip H Wicksteed; Thomas Okey
Publisher: New York : Modern Library, ©1932.
Series: The Modern library of the world's best books, 208
Edition/Format:   Book : Fiction : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In middle age Dante realizes he has strayed from the True Way into the Dark Wood of Error, or Wordliness. When he realizes his loss, he looks up to see the first light of the sun, the symbol of divine illumination, lighting the top of a small hill, the Mount of Joy. It is Easter, the time of resurrection and rebirth. These symbols fill Dante with hope and he sets out immediately to climb to the top of Mount Joy. His  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Material Type: Fiction
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Dante Alighieri; John Aitken Carlyle; Philip H Wicksteed; Thomas Okey
OCLC Number: 2061501
Notes: The translation of the Inferno is by J.A. Carlyle, of the Purgatorio by Thomas Okey and of the Paradiso by P.H. Wicksteed.
Description: xix, 625 p. : ill., geneal. tables, maps ; 19 cm.
Series Title: The Modern library of the world's best books, 208
Responsibility: of Dante Alighieri ; the Carlyle-Wicksteed translation ; introduction by C.H. Grandgent.

Abstract:

In middle age Dante realizes he has strayed from the True Way into the Dark Wood of Error, or Wordliness. When he realizes his loss, he looks up to see the first light of the sun, the symbol of divine illumination, lighting the top of a small hill, the Mount of Joy. It is Easter, the time of resurrection and rebirth. These symbols fill Dante with hope and he sets out immediately to climb to the top of Mount Joy. His way is blocked, however, by the Three Beasts of Worldliness--the Leopard of Malice and Fraud, the Lion of violence and ambition, and the She-Wolf of Incntinence--who will drive him back into the darkness of error. When all seems lost, Virgil, Dante's symbol of human reason, to lead him from error. With the easy way to the Mount of Joy blacked, Dante must travel the more difficult way through Hell and Purgatory before reaching the light of God. To help him, Virgil offers Dante another Guide--Beatrice, the symbol of divine love.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(2)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/2061501>
library:oclcnum"2061501"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/2061501>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:copyrightYear"1932"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1932"
schema:description"In middle age Dante realizes he has strayed from the True Way into the Dark Wood of Error, or Wordliness. When he realizes his loss, he looks up to see the first light of the sun, the symbol of divine illumination, lighting the top of a small hill, the Mount of Joy. It is Easter, the time of resurrection and rebirth. These symbols fill Dante with hope and he sets out immediately to climb to the top of Mount Joy. His way is blocked, however, by the Three Beasts of Worldliness--the Leopard of Malice and Fraud, the Lion of violence and ambition, and the She-Wolf of Incntinence--who will drive him back into the darkness of error. When all seems lost, Virgil, Dante's symbol of human reason, to lead him from error. With the easy way to the Mount of Joy blacked, Dante must travel the more difficult way through Hell and Purgatory before reaching the light of God. To help him, Virgil offers Dante another Guide--Beatrice, the symbol of divine love."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1862324621>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The divine comedy"@en
schema:numberOfPages"625"
schema:publisher
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.