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Dixie betrayed : how the South really lost the Civil War

Author: David J Eicher
Publisher: New York : Little, Brown, 2006.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
A study in how governments can self-destruct during wartime. For more than a century, the conventional wisdom has been that the South lost because of overwhelming Union strength and bad luck. The Confederates have been lionized as noble warriors who fought for an honorable cause with little chance of succeeding. But historian Eicher reveals a calamity of political conspiracy, discord, and dysfunction. Drawing on  Read more...
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Details

Named Person: Jefferson Davis; Jefferson Davis
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: David J Eicher
ISBN: 0316739057 9780316739054
OCLC Number: 61651438
Description: x, 338 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Contents: Prologue --
Birth of a nation --
Portrait of a President --
The War Department --
A curious cabinet --
The military high command --
State rightisms --
Richmond, the capital --
The rise of Lee and Bragg --
An uneasy brotherhood --
Jockeying for position --
Politics spinning out of control --
Can't we all get along? --
Soiled reputations --
The President versus the Congress --
Military highs and lows --
Slaves as soldiers? --
Peace proposals --
Epilogue : Despair --
Appendix: Executive officers of the Confederate States, 1861-1865 ; Congresses of the Confederate States, 1861-1865.
Responsibility: David J. Eicher.
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Abstract:

America's most brilliant young Civil War historian offers a radical new way of understanding the South's defeat: that the Confederacy was defeated by self-inflicted wounds.  Read more...

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'I like Elisabeth Russell Taylor. She gets better and better' A.S. Byatt.

 
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schema:description"A study in how governments can self-destruct during wartime. For more than a century, the conventional wisdom has been that the South lost because of overwhelming Union strength and bad luck. The Confederates have been lionized as noble warriors who fought for an honorable cause with little chance of succeeding. But historian Eicher reveals a calamity of political conspiracy, discord, and dysfunction. Drawing on previously unexplored sources, Eicher shows how President Jefferson Davis viciously fought with the Confederate House and Senate, governors, and his own cabinet. Confederate senators threatened each other with physical violence; some were brutal drunks, others, hopeless idealists. Military commanders were assigned not by skill but because of personal connections. Davis frequently interfered with his generals in the field, ignoring the chain of command. Also, some states wanted to set themselves up as separate nations, further undermining efforts to conduct a unified war effort.--From publisher description."@en
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