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Do the crime, do the time : juvenile criminals and adult justice in the American court system

Author: G Larry Mays; Rick Ruddell
Publisher: Santa Barbara, Calif. : Praeger, 2012.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This book provides a look at the way the United States is choosing to deal with some of the serious or persistent youth offenders: by transferring juvenile offenders to adult courts. The first juvenile court was created in the United States in 1899. Since then, there have always been provisions in juvenile courts for those rare youngsters who would be more appropriately handled by the adult criminal courts. However,  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: G Larry Mays; Rick Ruddell
ISBN: 9780313392429 0313392420 9780313392436 0313392439
OCLC Number: 745980501
Description: xv, 242 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: Adult time for adult crimes --
Understanding the system --
Juvenile crime and transfer trends --
Transfers and public policy --
The Supreme Court defines the boundaries of juvenile justice --
Public opinion, public policy, and juvenile justice --
Implications of transfers for juvenile offenders --
Future of transfers.
Responsibility: G. Larry Mays and Rick Ruddell.

Abstract:

This book provides a fresh look at the way the United States is choosing to deal with some of the serious or persistent youth offenders: by transferring juvenile offenders to adult courts.  Read more...

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"In their comprehensive overview, Mays (emer., New Mexico State Univ.) and Ruddell (Univ. of Regina, Canada) explain how the rehabilitative goals of juvenile justice reformers have been altered by Read more...

 
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