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Do We Need An Information Corps? (Joint Force Quarterly, Autumn 1993)

Author: Martin C Libicki; James A Hazlett; NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIV WASHINGTON DC CENTER FOR COUNTERPROLIFERATION RESEARCH.
Publisher: Ft. Belvoir Defense Technical Information Center JAN 1993.
Edition/Format:   eBook : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Warfare is about to enter a new phase that will upset the traditional balance between information and force. As firepower becomes an appendage to information, organizational transformations will begin to underpin a new architecture. A separate Information Corps could guide this revolution, create common doctrine for the diverse requirements of information warriors, and facilitate liaison among civilian information  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Martin C Libicki; James A Hazlett; NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIV WASHINGTON DC CENTER FOR COUNTERPROLIFERATION RESEARCH.
OCLC Number: 74272140
Notes: The original document contains color images.
Description: 11 p.

Abstract:

Warfare is about to enter a new phase that will upset the traditional balance between information and force. As firepower becomes an appendage to information, organizational transformations will begin to underpin a new architecture. A separate Information Corps could guide this revolution, create common doctrine for the diverse requirements of information warriors, and facilitate liaison among civilian information agencies. Such a corps could also obviate the need for the services to integrate their data systems because standardization would exist from the outset. Moreover, the corps could foster innovations more consonant with the logic of the information revolution than would be the case if the services were left to their own devices. But even though the proposal for such a corps has merit, a number of issues concerning its likely impact on operational autonomy, the critical functions of operational units, and certain joint imperatives must first be addressed.

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