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Doctors in the movies : boil the water and just say Aah

Author: Peter E Dans
Publisher: Bloomington, Ill. : Medi-Ed Press, ©2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Peter Dans compares the real-life changes in medicine to the changes depicted in film. Myth, like denial, is central to human existence and no one has made myths better than Hollywood, shaping how we think about ourselves and those around us by reinforcing stereotypes or creating new ones. This book is about how Hollywood has portrayed medicine over the last sixty years, as seen through the eyes of a board-certified  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Dans, Peter E.
Doctors in the movies.
Bloomington, Ill. : Medi-Ed Press, c2000
(OCoLC)606261355
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Peter E Dans
ISBN: 0936741147 9780936741147
OCLC Number: 45080151
Description: xxiv, 384 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Hollywood goes to medical school --
Of human bondage --
Miss Susie Slagle's --
Doctor in the house --
Not as a stranger --
Gross anatomy --
Flatliners --
Patch Adams --
Kindly savior: from Doctor Bull to Doc Hollywood --
Dedicated solo general practitioner --
Doctor Bull --
Country doctor --
Meet Dr. Christian --
Doctor Jim --
Welcome stranger --
People will talk --
Last angry man --
Doc Hollywood --
Benevolent institutions --
Surgeons as the golden boys of medicine --
Men in white --
Society doctor --
Internes [i.e. interns] can't take money --
Diagnostician --
Young Dr. Kildaire --
Dr. Kildaire's crisis --
Dr. Kildaire's wedding day --
Twilight of the golden age of medical movies --
Young doctors --
Interns --
Temple of science --
Price of hubris --
Doctor X --
Arrowsmith --
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde --
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein --
Glory of science: Pasteur, Ehrlich, and the Curies --
Story of Louis Pasteur --
Dr. Ehrlich's magic bullet --
Madame Curie --
Medical science in postwar films --
Medicine man --
Lorenzo's oil --
Where are all the women doctors? --
Mary Stevens, M.D. --
Dr. Monica --
Woman doctor --
Spellbound --
Girl in white --
Coma --
Prince of Tides --
Beyond rangoon --
Blacks, the invisible doctors --
Lost boundaries --
No way out --
Guess who's coming to dinner --
Heart is a lonely hunter --
Outbreak --
Eve's bayou --
Dark side of doctors --
Citadel --
Kings row --
Sister Kenny --
Dead ringers --
Doctor --
Malice --
Playing God --
Institutions turn evil --
M*A*S*H --
Hospital --
One flew over the cuckoo's nest --
Verdict --
Article 99 --
New villains: HMOs and insurers --
As good as it gets --
Rainmaker --
Critical care --
Temple of healing --
Symphony of six million --
Green light --
Magnificent obsession, 1935 --
Magnificent obsession, 1954 --
Separation of medicine and religion --
Extreme measures --
More good movie doctors and other personal favorites --
House calls --
What about Bob? --
Third man --
Doctor Zhivago --
Like water for chocolate --
Fugitive --
City of joy --
Awakenings --
Recurring medical themes and stereotypes.
Responsibility: Peter E. Dans.

Abstract:

Peter Dans compares the real-life changes in medicine to the changes depicted in film. Myth, like denial, is central to human existence and no one has made myths better than Hollywood, shaping how we think about ourselves and those around us by reinforcing stereotypes or creating new ones. This book is about how Hollywood has portrayed medicine over the last sixty years, as seen through the eyes of a board-certified internist on the faculty of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The author blends a brief historical context with an in-depth discussion of more than seventy films, from "Arrowsmith", "Internes Can't Take Money", "Society Doctor", and "The Girl in White", through "No Way Out" and "The Last Angry Man", to "Hospital", "Coma", "Critical Care", and "Awakenings". One can see the progression of medical students from naíve idealists in 1948's "Miss Susie Slagle's" to cynical nonconformists in "Gross Anatomy". Similarly, changes are visible in the doctor's image from the kindly "Country Doctor" and the earnest "Dr. Kildare" to the arrogant egotists of "The Doctor" and "Malice". Intended to be both fun and instructive, the book has a lighter side that looks at clichés and stereotypes, such as someone shouting "boil the water" when a baby is about to be delivered, doctors as "sex maniacs," and ludicrous portrayals of surgeons directing their own abdominal operations. On a more serious note, the movies illustrate what the public has valued in doctoring, the changing attitudes towards science, and the evolution of issues that still confront and divide us. Assisted suicide or "mercy killing," abortion, concerns about health care costs and impersonal high-tech medicine are all in evidence. Two chapters deal with the virtual invisibility of women and black doctors in film. Concluding with a chapter on some of the author's favorite movies about medicine, the book has an extensive filmography and bibliography inviting readers to explore the subject further. Though there have been books written about psychiatrists in the movies, this is the first book to look broadly at medicine and physicians in film. While appealing to doctors and those interested in health care and medical science, it also fills a void for film buffs by focusing on a neglected movie genre [Publisher description]

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