skip to content
Drakōn : dragon myth and serpent cult in the Greek and Roman worlds Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Drakōn : dragon myth and serpent cult in the Greek and Roman worlds

Author: Daniel Ogden
Publisher: Oxford, UK : Oxford University Press, 2013.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : First editionView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Drakōn: Dragon Myth and Serpent Cult in the Greek and Roman Wolrds is the first substantial survey to be focally devoted to the "dragon" or the supernatural serpent, the drakōn or drakō, in Greek and Roman myth and religion. Almost every major myth cycle of the Greek and Roman worlds featured a dragon-fight at its heart, including the sagas of Heracles, Jason, Perseus, Cadmus, and Odysseus. Asclepius, the single  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Daniel Ogden
ISBN: 9780199557325 0199557322
OCLC Number: 795759766
Description: xviii, 472 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Drakōn fights : drakontes pure --
Drakōn fights : drakontes composite --
Fights with Kete, Sea-serpents --
World of the slain drakontes --
Masters and mistresses of drakontes --
Symmetrical battle between Drakōn and slayer --
Drakontes, Earth, and the dead --
Drakōn gods of wealth and good luck --
Drakōn gods of healing --
Day in the life of a sacred snake --
Birth of the Christian dragon.
Responsibility: Daniel Ogden.
More information:

Abstract:

This volume explores the dragon or the supernatural serpent in Graeco-Roman myth and religion. It incorporates analyses, with comprehensive accounts of the rich literary and iconographic sources, for  Read more...

Reviews

Editorial reviews

Publisher Synopsis

meticulously researched ... Recommended. S.E. Goins, CHOICE

 
User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/795759766>
library:oclcnum"795759766"
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdf:typeschema:MediaObject
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"First edition."
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2013"
schema:description"Drakōn fights : drakontes pure -- Drakōn fights : drakontes composite -- Fights with Kete, Sea-serpents -- World of the slain drakontes -- Masters and mistresses of drakontes -- Symmetrical battle between Drakōn and slayer -- Drakontes, Earth, and the dead -- Drakōn gods of wealth and good luck -- Drakōn gods of healing -- Day in the life of a sacred snake -- Birth of the Christian dragon."@en
schema:description""Drakōn: Dragon Myth and Serpent Cult in the Greek and Roman Wolrds is the first substantial survey to be focally devoted to the "dragon" or the supernatural serpent, the drakōn or drakō, in Greek and Roman myth and religion. Almost every major myth cycle of the Greek and Roman worlds featured a dragon-fight at its heart, including the sagas of Heracles, Jason, Perseus, Cadmus, and Odysseus. Asclepius, the single most beloved and influential of the pagan gods from the late Classical period until Late Antiquity, was often manifest as a giant serpent and even in his humanoid aspect carried a serpent on his staff. Detailed and authoritative, but lucidly presented, this volume incorporates analyses of all of antiquity's major dragon-slaying myths, and offers comprehensive accounts of the rich sources, literary and iconographic. Ogden also explores matters of cult and the initially paradoxical association of dragons and serpents with the most benign of deities, not only those of health and healing, like Asclepius and Hygieia, but also those of wealth and good luck, such as Zeus Meilichios and Agathos Daimon. The concluding chapter considers the roles of both pagan dragon-slaying narratives and pagan serpent cults in shaping the beginnings of the tradition of the saintly dragon- and serpent-slaying tales we cherish still, the tradition that culminates in our own stories of Saints George and Patrick."--Publisher's website."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1222105447>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Drakōn : dragon myth and serpent cult in the Greek and Roman worlds"@en
schema:workExample
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.