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Duchamp in context : science and technology in the Large glass and related works

Author: Linda Dalrymple Henderson
Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, ©1998.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Between 1912 and 1918, Marcel Duchamp made hundreds of notes in preparation for the execution of his major work, The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (1915-23), also known as the Large Glass. Considering these notes to be as important as the Glass itself, Duchamp published three sets during his lifetime - 178 notes in all. But since his death in 1968, more than 100 further notes about the work have been
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: Marcel Duchamp; Marcel Duchamp; Marcel Duchamp; Marcel Duchamp; Marcel Duchamp; Marcel Duchamp
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Linda Dalrymple Henderson
ISBN: 0691055513 9780691055510 9780691123868 0691123861
OCLC Number: 37770807
Awards: University of Texas Cooperative Society, Robert W. Hamilton Author Award, 1999.
Description: xxiii, 373 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
Contents: Part I: Duchamp and invisible reality, 1911-1912. Duchamp's first quest for the invisible: x-rays, transparency, and internal views of the figure, 1911-1912 ; X-rays: history and popularization ; Duchamp's painting and x-rays, 1911-1912 ; Picabia, Cubism, and x-rays ; The invisible reality of matter itself: electrons, radioactivity, and even alchemy, spring and summer 1912 ; Giving form to electrons ; Munich works, summer 1912: radioactivity, alchemy, and chemistry ; Munich works, summer 1912: first borrowings from the language of technology --
Part II: The transition from painter to artist as engineer-scientist, fall, 1912-1914. From painter to engineer, I: Depersonalization of drawing style and adoption of human-machine analogies, fall 1912-1913 ; New approaches to the drawn line ; Duchamp, the machine, and human-machine analogies ; The "Jura-Paris Road" Project ; The lure of science: imaginative scientists (Crookes, Tesla) and scientific imaginations (Jarry, Roussel) ; Sir William Crookes (1832-1919): Science and the unknown ; Nikola Tesla (1856-1943): Science as spectacle ; Alfred Jarry (1873-1907): Themes of electromagnetism and electricity in "Docteur Faustroll" and "Le Surmâle" ; Raymond Roussel (1877-1933): Scientific machines in "Impressions d'Afrique" ; From painter to engineer, II: A Rousselian dialogue with the equipment of science and technology begins, 1913-1914 ; "Painting of precision": "Chocolate grinder (No. 1)" and "Chocolate grinder (No. 2)" ; "Beauty of indifference": "Musical erratum," the "3 Standard stoppages," and the early readymades. Part III: "Playful" science and technology in The Bride stripped bare by her bachelors, even (The large glass), 1915-1923 ; Toward the large glass: the box of 1914 and general introduction to the glass ; The "Box of 1914" and the model of Leonardo's science ; New York, 1915: Execution of the "Large glass" begins ; First conceptions of the Bride and her interaction with the bachelors ; The theme of collision: from popular culture to science and beyond ; The Bride as automobile ; The Bride as a modern automaton descended from Villiers's "L'Eve future" ; The Large glass as a painting of electromagnetic frequency ; Hertzian waves and wireless telegraphy in French culture and avant-garde literature ; Communication via electromagnetic waves in the art and theory of Kupka ; Wireless telegraphy, telepathy, and radio control in the "Large glass" ; "Appareils enregistreurs" and other indexical signs in the "Large glass" ; Other scientific and technological dimensions of the Bride ; Meteorology and the Eiffel Tower ; The Bride as an incandescent lightbulb ; Biology and the Bride: J.-H. Fabre and Remy de Gourmont ; Other scientific and technological dimensions of the Bachelors, I: The Bachelor apparatus as playground of the would-be physical chemist ; Old and new identities in the Bachelor apparatus ; Chemistry, physical chemistry, the liquefaction of gases, and Jean Perrin's "Molecular reality" ; Other scientific and technological dimensions of the Bachelors, II: The unknown mobile and desire dynamo, playful mechanics, and agriculture in the Large glass ; Rediscovering the mobile, the desire dynamo, and aspects of energy and power in the Bachelor apparatus ; Playful mechanics in the chariot and the juggler/handler of gravity ; The chariot as the "Plow of life" in Duchamp's "Machine agricole" --
Part IV: Conclusion. Conclusion, I: New thoughts on style and content in relation to science and technology in Duchamp's Large glass ; The Musée des Arts et Métiers, Roussel, and Duchamp's humorous invention of a "Plastically imaged mixture of events" ; The "Large glass" as a scientific-technological allegory of love and life: The Virgin, Persephone, and the Eiffel Tower ; Conclusion, II: An overview of Duchamp's playful science and technology in the Large glass and related early works ; From Bergsonian Cubism to science and invention: a "Continuum of--
magnetization or of repulsion" ; A review of science, technology, and self-fashioning in Duchamp's early works, the "Large Glass" Project, and the readymades ; The "Large glass" in the context of early twentieth-century modernism ; Coda: Extensions and echoes of the Large glass ; Electricity and electromagnetism in Duchamp's later works ; The 1950s Legal tablet listings: thoughts of another "box"? --
Appendix A: The collection of notes Duchamp contemplated in his 1950s Legal tablet listings --
Appendix B: A note on the construction of Duchamp as alchemist.
Responsibility: Linda Dalrymple Henderson.
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Abstract:

Between 1915 and 1923, Marcel Duchamp created one of the mystifying art works of the early twentieth century: "The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even" (also known as the "Large Glass"). This  Read more...

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A remarkable new study ... I greatly recommend Henderson's book as an exciting exploration of the borders between art and science, as they were traced at the dawn of Moderism by an elliptical genius. Read more...

 
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