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The dynamics of rules : change in written organizational codes

Author: James G March; Martin Schulz; Hsüeh-kuang Chou
Publisher: Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press, ©2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This study uses qualitative and quantitative data from the history of a specific organization, Stanford University, to develop speculations about the ways in which written rules change. It contributes both to a theory of rules and to theories of organizational decision-making change, and learning. Organizations respond to problems and react to internal or external pressures by focusing attention on existing and  Read more...
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Genre/Form: By-laws
Case studies
Cas, Études de
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: James G March; Martin Schulz; Hsüeh-kuang Chou
ISBN: 0804737444 9780804737449 080473996X 9780804739962
OCLC Number: 43245810
Description: xi, 228 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: Rules in Organizations. Rules at Stanford. Speculating about Rule Dynamics. An Event History Approach. Explaining Patterns of Rule Birth. Explaining Patterns of Rule Change. Regularities in Rule Dynamics. Toward an Understanding of Rules.
Responsibility: James G. March, Martin Schulz, Xueguang Zhou.
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Abstract:

This study uses qualitative and quantitative data from the history of a specific organization, Stanford University, to develop speculations about the ways in which written rules change. It  Read more...

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"In developing an elegant and sophisticated theory of how and why organizational rules change, the authors have created an entirely new field of organizational research. I know of no other general Read more...

 
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