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Early American views on Negro slavery : from the letters and papers of the founders of the Republic

Author: Matthew T MellonBenjamin FranklinGeorge WashingtonJohn AdamsThomas JeffersonAll authors
Publisher: New York, NY : Bergman Publishers, 1969.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : [New ed.View all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Introduction: Mr. Mellon's illuminating presentation of the views of some of the founding fathers on slavery and the Negro exposes the raw nerve of American democratic society. If the central theme of the American Revolution was freedom and equality, the impact of that epochal struggle upon the black man was at best peripheral. The Declaration of Independence had dedicated the Revolution to the proposition that "all  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Mellon, Matthew T. (Matthew Taylor), 1897-
Early American views on Negro slavery.
New York, Bergman Publishers [1969]
(OCoLC)560768933
Online version:
Mellon, Matthew T. (Matthew Taylor), 1897-
Early American views on Negro slavery.
New York, Bergman Publishers [1969]
(OCoLC)626353334
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Matthew T Mellon; Benjamin Franklin; George Washington; John Adams; Thomas Jefferson; James Madison
OCLC Number: 5863
Notes: "The views considered are those of Benjamin Franklin and the first four Presidents of the United States."
Description: xvii, 187 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: Introduction / Richard B Morris --
Preface --
Part 1: Benjamin Franklin's Views On Negro Slavery --
1: Franklin's education and early environment --
2: Colonial views on slavery --
3: Pennsylvania society for promoting the abolition of slavery --
4: Franklin's memorial to Congress and the debate that followed --
5: Summary of Franklin's views --
Part 2: George Washington's Views On Negro Slavery --
1: Real and the false Washington --
2: Slavery and the Virginia tradition --
3: Washington's pre-revolutionary views on slavery --
4: Washington's attitude toward Negroes as soldiers --
5: Washington and Phillis Wheatley, slave poetess --
6: Effect of the war on Washington's views toward free Negroes as soldiers --
7: Washington's and Hamilton's views on Negro slaves as soldiers --
8: Washington's reaction to Lafayette's proposals --
9: Wavering principles, 1785-1787 --
10: Washington at the Constitutional Convention --
11: Status of the Negro during the Presidency of Washington --
12: Negro slave in Washington's will --
13: Summary --
Part 3: John Adam's Views On Negro Slavery --
His statement --
Part 4: Thomas Jefferson's Views On Negro Slavery --
1: Why Jefferson's views are important --
2: Jefferson's inheritance and education --
3: First effort to emancipate the slaves --
4: Instruction to the Virginia delegation --
5: Declaration of Independence --
6: Jefferson's Virginia reforms --
7: Notes on Virginia --
8: Sack of Monticello, and Rochefoucauld's visit --
9: Ordinance of 1787, Act of 1807, Act of 1807 and the Missouri Compromise --
10: Jefferson's will and summary of his views --
Part 5: James Madison's Views On Negro Slavery --
1: Importance of Madison's views --
2: Madison in the Federal Convention of 1787 --
3: As President of the United States --
4: Madison's plan for Emancipation --
5: Letter further illustrating his plan --
6: Queries and some statistics --
7: Constitution and the Missouri question --
8: Madison and the Colonization Society --
9: His views in old age --
10: Summary of Madison's views --
Some conclusions drawn from a study of the foregoing material --
Notes --
Bibliography --
Index.
Other Titles: Negro slavery
From the letters and papers of the founders of the Republic
Responsibility: by Matthew T. Mellon.

Abstract:

Introduction: Mr. Mellon's illuminating presentation of the views of some of the founding fathers on slavery and the Negro exposes the raw nerve of American democratic society. If the central theme of the American Revolution was freedom and equality, the impact of that epochal struggle upon the black man was at best peripheral. The Declaration of Independence had dedicated the Revolution to the proposition that "all men are created equal." There were some who wondered whether that proposition would be applied to the ending of slavery, the greatest of all human inequalities.

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schema:description"Introduction / Richard B Morris -- Preface -- Part 1: Benjamin Franklin's Views On Negro Slavery -- 1: Franklin's education and early environment -- 2: Colonial views on slavery -- 3: Pennsylvania society for promoting the abolition of slavery -- 4: Franklin's memorial to Congress and the debate that followed -- 5: Summary of Franklin's views -- Part 2: George Washington's Views On Negro Slavery -- 1: Real and the false Washington -- 2: Slavery and the Virginia tradition -- 3: Washington's pre-revolutionary views on slavery -- 4: Washington's attitude toward Negroes as soldiers -- 5: Washington and Phillis Wheatley, slave poetess -- 6: Effect of the war on Washington's views toward free Negroes as soldiers -- 7: Washington's and Hamilton's views on Negro slaves as soldiers -- 8: Washington's reaction to Lafayette's proposals -- 9: Wavering principles, 1785-1787 -- 10: Washington at the Constitutional Convention -- 11: Status of the Negro during the Presidency of Washington -- 12: Negro slave in Washington's will -- 13: Summary -- Part 3: John Adam's Views On Negro Slavery -- His statement -- Part 4: Thomas Jefferson's Views On Negro Slavery -- 1: Why Jefferson's views are important -- 2: Jefferson's inheritance and education -- 3: First effort to emancipate the slaves -- 4: Instruction to the Virginia delegation -- 5: Declaration of Independence -- 6: Jefferson's Virginia reforms -- 7: Notes on Virginia -- 8: Sack of Monticello, and Rochefoucauld's visit -- 9: Ordinance of 1787, Act of 1807, Act of 1807 and the Missouri Compromise -- 10: Jefferson's will and summary of his views -- Part 5: James Madison's Views On Negro Slavery -- 1: Importance of Madison's views -- 2: Madison in the Federal Convention of 1787 -- 3: As President of the United States -- 4: Madison's plan for Emancipation -- 5: Letter further illustrating his plan -- 6: Queries and some statistics -- 7: Constitution and the Missouri question -- 8: Madison and the Colonization Society -- 9: His views in old age -- 10: Summary of Madison's views -- Some conclusions drawn from a study of the foregoing material -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index."@en
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