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The East in the West

Author: Jack Goody
Publisher: Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1996.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The East in the West reassesses Western views of Asia. Traditionally many European historians and theorists have seen the societies of the East as 'static' or 'backward'. Jack Goody challenges these assumptions, beginning with the notion of a special Western rationality which enabled 'us' and not 'them' to modernise. He then turns to book-keeping, which several social and economic historians have seen as intrinsic  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Cross-cultural studies
History
Études transculturelles
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Jack Goody
ISBN: 0521553601 9780521553605 0521556732 9780521556736
OCLC Number: 33664683
Description: x, 295 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Contents: Introduction: the West's problem with the East --
1. Rationality in review --
2. Rationality and ragioneria: the keeping of books and the economic miracle --
3. Indian trade and economy in the medieval and early colonial periods --
4. The growth of Indian commerce and industry --
5. Family and business in the East --
6. From collective to individual? The historiography of the family in the West --
7. Labour, production and communication --
8. Revaluations --
Appendix: early links between East and West.
Responsibility: Jack Goody.
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Abstract:

The East in the West reassesses Western views of Asia. Traditionally many European historians and theorists have seen the societies of the East as 'static' or 'backward'. Jack Goody challenges these assumptions, beginning with the notion of a special Western rationality which enabled 'us' and not 'them' to modernise. He then turns to book-keeping, which several social and economic historians have seen as intrinsic to capitalism, arguing that there was in fact little difference between East and West in terms of mercantile activity. Other factors said to inhibit the East's development, such as the family and forms of labour, have also been greatly exaggerated. This Eurocentrism both fails to explain the current achievements of the East, and misunderstands Western history. The East in the West starts to redress the balance, and so marks a fundamental shift in our view of Western and Eastern history and society. -- Publisher description from http://www.cambridge.org (Oct. 14, 2011).

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