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Echo of the big bang

Author: Michael D Lemonick
Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, ©2003.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"A tight-knit, high-powered group of scientists and engineers spent eight years building a satellite designed, in effect, to read the genome of the universe. Launched in 2001, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has finally reported in - and it's found things nobody expected." "For more than a year, the WMAP satellite hovered in the cold of deep space, a million miles from Earth, in an effort to  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Michael D Lemonick
ISBN: 0691102783 9780691102788
OCLC Number: 51046843
Notes: Includes index.
Description: 215 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Is something amiss in the universe? --
The birth of cosmology --
A whisper of microwaves --
Bad Blood --
Now what? --
Forming a team --
How to design a satellite --
The build --
Horse race --
Launch --
Deepening mystery --
The answer.
Responsibility: Michael D. Lemonick.
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Abstract:

"A tight-knit, high-powered group of scientists and engineers spent eight years building a satellite designed, in effect, to read the genome of the universe. Launched in 2001, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has finally reported in - and it's found things nobody expected." "For more than a year, the WMAP satellite hovered in the cold of deep space, a million miles from Earth, in an effort to determine whether the science of cosmology - the study of the origin and evolution of the universe - has been on the right track for the past two decades. What WMAP was looking for was a barely perceptible pattern of hot and cold spots in the faint whisper of microwave radiation left over from the Big Bang, the event that gave birth to all of space, time, matter, and energy." "The pattern encoded in those microwaves holds the answers to some of the great unanswered questions of cosmology: What is the universe made of? What is its geometry? How much of it consists of this mysterious dark matter and dark energy that continues to baffle astronomers? How fast is it expanding? And did it undergo a period of inflationary hyper-expansion at the very beginning? WMAP has now given definitive answers to these mysteries." "On February 11, 2003, the team of researchers went public with the results. Just some of their extraordinary findings: The universe is 13.7 billion years old. The first stars "turned on" when the universe was only 200 million years old, five times earlier than anyone had thought. It is now certain that a mysterious dark energy dominates the universe." "Michael Lemonick, who had exclusive access to the researches as WMAP gathered its data, here tells the full story of WMAP and its surprising revelations." "This book is both a personal and a scientific tale of discovery. In its pages, readers will come to know the science of cosmology and the people who have finally, seventy-four years after we first learned that the universe is expanding, deciphered its mysteries."--BOOK JACKET.

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