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Ecological Exile : Spatial Injustice and Environmental Humanities

Author: Derek Gladwin
Publisher: London : Taylor and Francis, 2017.
Series: Routledge Environmental Humanities
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : First editionView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Ecological Exile explores how contemporary literature, film, and media culture confront ecological crises through perspectives of spatial justice - a facet of social justice that looks at unjust circumstances as a phenomenon of space. Growing instances of flooding, population displacement, and pollution suggest an urgent need to re-examine the ways social and geographical spaces are perceived and valued in the 20th  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Derek Gladwin
ISBN: 9781315641478 131564147X
OCLC Number: 1004972634
Description: 1 online resource : text file, PDF.
Contents: Ecological Exile- Front Cover; Ecological Exile; Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; List of figures; Acknowledgements; Introduction: decoding spaces of ecological injustice; Reproducing ecospaces; A guide to the book; Notes; Bibliography; PART I: Space; Chapter 1: Spatial in/justice and place; Spatial theories of justice; Critical works; Place justice; Notes; Bibliography; Chapter 2: Solastalgia and the environmental humanities; Displacement of place-home; Humanities for the environment; â#x80;#x98;Exiles in our own countryâ#x80;#x99;; Notes; Bibliography; PART II: Oil; Chapter 3: Petrospaces. Society and oilEnergy humanities and the Anthropocene; Spatialising petromodernity; Place-taking; Culture and oil; Notes; Bibliography; Chapter 4: Speed of petrodrama; North Sea oil and Britain; The â#x80;#x98;laws of capitalismâ#x80;#x99;; A story without an ending; Notes; Bibliography; Chapter 5: Sullom Voe; Place and memory in petrospaces; Shetlandâ#x80;#x99;s place-based petrohistory; Spatial bodies and holographic memory; Anti-aesthetic effect of oil; Immemorial places of action; Notes; Bibliography; Chapter 6: Pipelines of injustice; More â#x80;#x98;oil troubleâ#x80;#x99;; Shell to Sea; Spaces of resistance. Protecting the peopleNotes; Bibliography; PART III: Climate; Chapter 7: Climate injustice; Everything must change; Climate science and global action; Climate breakdown and social change; Documenting the melt; The Earthâ#x80;#x99;s barometer; Notes; Bibliography; Chapter 8: Cli-fi; Hot genre of change; Fragmented selves, disintegrating climates; Climate homelessness; Notes; Bibliography; Chapter 9: Irony of catastrophe; The end is nigh; Inverted icebergs; Ecophobia; The end is the beginning; Notes; Bibliography.
Series Title: Routledge Environmental Humanities
Responsibility: Derek Gladwin.

Abstract:

"Ecological Exile explores how contemporary literature, film, and media culture confront ecological crises through perspectives of spatial justice - a facet of social justice that looks at unjust circumstances as a phenomenon of space. Growing instances of flooding, population displacement, and pollution suggest an urgent need to re-examine the ways social and geographical spaces are perceived and valued in the 20th and 21st Centuries. Maintaining that ecological crises are largely socially produced, Derek Gladwin considers how British and Irish literary and visual texts by Ian McEwan, Sarah Gavron, Eavan Boland, John McGrath, and China Miéville, among others, respond to and confront various spatial injustices resulting from fossil fuel production and the effects of climate change. This ambitious book offers a new spatial perspective in the environmental humanities by focusing on what the philosopher Glenn Albrecht has termed solastalgia, or a feeling of homesickness caused by environmental damage. The result of solastalgia is that people feel paradoxically ecologically exiled in the places they continue to live because of destructive environmental changes. Gladwin skilfully traces spatially produced instances of ecological injustice that literally and imaginatively abolish people's sense of place (or place-home). By looking at two of the most pressing social and environmental concerns - oil and climate - Ecological Exile shows how literary and visual texts have documented spatially unjust effects of solastalgia. This interdisciplinary book will appeal to students, scholars, and professionals studying literary, film, and media texts that draw on environment and sustainability, cultural geography, energy cultures, climate change, and social justice."--Provided by publisher.

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