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Economic geography : the integration of regions and nations

Author: Pierre-Philippe Combes; Thierry Mayer; Jacques-François Thisse
Publisher: Princeton, N.J. ; Woodstock, Oxfordshire : Princeton University Press, ©2008.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Economic Geography is the most complete, up-to-date textbook available on the important new field of spatial economics. This book fills a gap by providing advanced undergraduate and graduate students with the latest research and methodologies in an accessible and comprehensive way. It is an indispensable reference for researchers in economic geography, regional and urban economics, international trade, and applied  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Combes, Pierre-Philippe.
Economic geography.
Princeton, N.J. ; Woodstock, Oxfordshire : Princeton University Press, c2008
(OCoLC)681713032
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Pierre-Philippe Combes; Thierry Mayer; Jacques-François Thisse
ISBN: 9780691124599 0691124590 9780691139425 0691139423
OCLC Number: 231586878
Language Note: Translation of: Économie géographique : l'intégration des régions et des nations. Paris : Economica, c2006. (Corpus économie).
Description: xxiii, 399 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Contents: Foreword xiii Acknowledgments xxiv Part I: Facts and Theories 1 CHAPTER 1: Spatial Inequalities: A Brief Historical Overview 3 1.1 The Space-Economy and the Industrial Revolution 4 1.2 Regional Disparities: When an Ancient Phenomenon Becomes Measurable 12 1.3 Concluding Remarks 25 CHAPTER 2: Space in Economic Thought 26 2.1 Economics and Geography: A Puzzling History of Reciprocal Ignorance 27 2.2 Integrating Space in Economics: The Main Attempts 30 2.3 The Burden of Modeling Constraints 31 2.4 The Breakdown of the Competitive Paradigm in a Spatial Economy 35 2.5 What Are the Alternative Modeling Strategies? 41 2.6 Increasing Returns and Transport Costs: The Basic Trade-Off of Economic Geography 43 2.7 Concluding Remarks 48 Part II: Space, Trade, and Agglomeration 51 CHAPTER 3: Monopolistic Competition 53 3.1 The Dixit-Stiglitz Approach 55 3.2 Monopolistic Competition: A Linear Setting 71 3.3 Concluding Remarks 79 3.4 Related Literature 80 CHAPTER 4: Interregional Trade and Market Size 81 4.1 The Dixit-Stiglitz-Krugman Model of Trade 82 4.2 The Home-Market Effect 89 4.3 Concluding Remarks 98 4.4 Related Literature 100 CHAPTER 5: Gravity and Trade Costs 101 5.1 The Gravity Model 103 5.2 Trade Costs 115 5.3 Concluding Remarks 127 5.4 Related Literature 127 CHAPTER 6: The Core-Periphery Structure 130 6.1 Increasing Returns and Industrialization 133 6.2 Regional Disparities: The Krugman Model 137 6.3 The Krugman Model Revisited 160 6.4 Concluding Remarks 162 6.5 Related Literature 164 CHAPTER 7: Intermediate Goods and the Evolution of Regional Disparities 166 7.1 The Role of Intermediate Goods 169 7.2 The Spatial Distribution of the Manufacturing Sector 176 7.3 The Evolution of Regional Disparities 185 7.4 Concluding Remarks 191 7.5 Related Literature 192 CHAPTER 8: The Bell-Shaped Curve of Spatial Development 194 8.1 A Linear Core-Periphery Model 196 8.2 When Does the Bell-Shaped Curve Arise? 207 8.3 Concluding Remarks 221 8.4 Related Literature 222 CHAPTER 9: Spatial Competition 223 9.1 Spatial Duopoly a la Hotelling 224 9.2 Spatial Oligopoly a la Cournot 238 9.3 Concluding Remarks 250 9.4 Related Literature 251 Part III: Breadth and Determinants of Spatial Concentration 253 CHAPTER 10: Measuring Spatial Concentration 255 10.1 The Properties of an Ideal Index of Spatial Concentration 256 10.2 Spatial Concentration Indices 259 10.3 Indices Accounting for Industrial Concentration 266 10.4 The Duranton-Overman Continuous Approach 269 10.5 Concluding Remarks 274 10.6 Related Literature 274 CHAPTER 11: Determinants of Spatial Concentration and Local Productivity 276 11.1 The Determinants of Spatial Concentration 277 11.2 The Determinants of Local Productivity 283 11.3 Concluding Remarks 300 11.4 Related Literature 301 CHAPTER 12: The Empirics of Economic Geography 302 12.1 A General Framework 303 12.2 Location of Firms 307 12.3 Home-Market Effect 314 12.4 Factor Prices and Economic Geography 321 12.5 Migrations 329 12.6 The Stability of Spatial Patterns 332 12.7 Concluding Remarks 340 12.8 Related Literature 342 CHAPTER 13: Theory with Numbers 343 13.1 Predictions Based on the Dixit-Stiglitz-Krugman Model 345 13.2 Simulations in an Estimated Model of the French Space-Economy 356 13.3 Concluding Remarks 363 13.4 Related Literature 364 CHAPTER 14: Concluding Remarks 365 14.1 The Paradox of the Global Village 365 14.2 The Objective of Economic Geography 367 14.3 What Have We Learned? 368 14.4 Where Next? 374 References 379 Index 397.
Other Titles: Économie géographique.
Responsibility: Pierre-Philippe Combes, Thierry Mayer & Jacques-François Thisse.
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Complements theoretical analysis with detailed discussions of the empirics of the economics of agglomeration, offering a mix of theoretical and empirical research that gives a fresh perspective on  Read more...

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