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The edge of vision : the rise of abstraction in photography

Author: Lyle Rexer
Publisher: New York : Aperture : D.A.P./Distributed Art Publishers [distributor], ©2009.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
From the beginning, abstraction has been intrinsic to photography, and its persistent popularity reveals much about the medium. The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography is the first book in English to document this phenomenon and to put it into historical context, while also examining the diverse approaches thriving within contemporary photography. Author Lyle Rexer examines abstraction at pivotal  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Bildband
Named Person: Man Ray; William Henry Fox Talbot; Silvio Wolf; László Moholy-Nagy; Mel Bochner; James Welling; Mel Bochner; Man Ray; László Moholy-Nagy; William Henry Fox Talbot; James Welling; Silvio Wolf
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Lyle Rexer
ISBN: 9781597111003 1597111007
OCLC Number: 276334174
Description: 291 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 27 cm
Contents: Undisclosed images --
Disclosure and uncertainty in early photography --
In light's captivity: spiritualized photography and the photo-secession --
Modernism: new eyes for old --
Stairways to heaven --
Subversives --
This is [not] a photograph --
Selected documents.
Responsibility: Lyle Rexer.

Abstract:

From the beginning, abstraction has been intrinsic to photography, and its persistent popularity reveals much about the medium. The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography is the first book in English to document this phenomenon and to put it into historical context, while also examining the diverse approaches thriving within contemporary photography. Author Lyle Rexer examines abstraction at pivotal moments, starting with the inception of photography, when many of the pioneers believed the camera might reveal other aspects of reality. The Edge of Vision traces subsequent explorations--from the Photo-Secessionists, who emphasized process and emotional expression over observed reality, to Modernist and Surrealist experiments. In the decades to follow, in particular from the 1950s through the 1980s, a multitude of photographers--Edward Weston, Aaron Siskind, Barbara Kasten, Ellen Carey, and James Welling, among them--took up abstraction from a variety of positions. Finally, Rexer explores the influence the history of abstraction exerts on contemporary thinking about the medium. Many contemporary artists--most prominently Penelope Umbrico, Michael Fomen, and Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin--reject classic definitions of photography's documentary dimension in favor of other conceptually inflected possibilities, somewhere between painting and performance art, that include the manipulation of process and printing. In addition to Rexer's engagingly written and richly illustrated history, this volume includes a selection of primary texts from and interviews with key practitioners and critics, such as Alvin Langdon Coburn, László Moholy-Nagy, Gottfried Jäger, Silvio Wolf, and Walead Beshty.

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Linked Data


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