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Effects of Client Bisexuality on Clinical Judgment: When Is Bias Most Likely to Occur?
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Effects of Client Bisexuality on Clinical Judgment: When Is Bias Most Likely to Occur?

Author: Jonathan J Mohr; Jennifer L Weiner; Regina M Chopp; Stephanie J Wong
Publisher: American Psychological Association. Journals Department, 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242. Tel: 800-374-2721; Tel: 202-336-5510; Fax: 202-336-5502; e-mail: order@apa.org; Web site: http://www.apa.org/publications
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Journal of Counseling Psychology, v56 n1 p164-175 Jan 2009
Database:ERIC The ERIC database is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Education.
Other Databases: ElsevierArticleFirstBritish Library Serials
Summary:
In this study, the authors investigated whether psychotherapist bias related to client bisexuality is most likely to occur with respect to judgments about stereotype-relevant clinical issues. Participants were 108 psychotherapists who read a fictitious intake report about a male client who was portrayed as heterosexual, gay, or bisexual. Client sexual orientation was behaviorally operationalized through reference to  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Jonathan J Mohr; Jennifer L Weiner; Regina M Chopp; Stephanie J Wong
ISSN:0022-0167
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 425496514
Awards:
Description: 12

Abstract:

In this study, the authors investigated whether psychotherapist bias related to client bisexuality is most likely to occur with respect to judgments about stereotype-relevant clinical issues. Participants were 108 psychotherapists who read a fictitious intake report about a male client who was portrayed as heterosexual, gay, or bisexual. Client sexual orientation was behaviorally operationalized through reference to the sex of the client's present and previous romantic partners. Participants rated the case for the salience of a variety of clinical issues (some of which were related to bisexual stereotypes), global psychological functioning, and anticipated reactions to the client. Client sexual orientation had no effect for outcomes unrelated to bisexual stereotypes. In contrast, clinical issues related to bisexual stereotypes were rated as most salient to the case when the client was portrayed as bisexual rather than when the client was portrayed as heterosexual or gay. This effect remained significant even when participants' self-reported ability to avoid bias, self-presentational concerns, and response set related to perceptions of psychopathology were controlled for. Exploratory analyses suggested that this effect was partially mediated by stereotypes of bisexual men as confused and conflicted. (Contains 2 figures and 4 tables.)

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