omitir hasta el contenido
Effects of functional ability and training on chair-rise biomechanics in older adults.
CerrarVer este material de antemano
Chequeando…

Effects of functional ability and training on chair-rise biomechanics in older adults.

Autor: NB Alexander Afiliación: Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. nalexand@umich.edu; MM Gross; JL Medell; MR Hofmeyer
Edición/Formato: Artículo Artículo : Inglés (eng)
Publicación:The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, 2001 Sep; 56(9): M538-47
Base de datos:De MEDLINE®/PubMed®, una base de datos de la Biblioteca Nacional de Medicina de los Estados Unidos.
Otras bases de datos: ArticleFirst
Resumen:
BACKGROUND: Difficulty in rising from a chair is common in older adults and may be assessed by examining the biomechanics of the rise. The purposes of this study were (i) to analyze the biomechanics of rise performance during chair-rise tasks with varying task demand in older adults with varying rise ability and (ii) to determine whether a strength-training program might improve chair-rise success and alter  Leer más
Calificación:

(todavía no calificado) 0 con reseñas - Ser el primero.

Más materiales como éste

 

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving;

Encontrar un ejemplar en la biblioteca

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Encontrando bibliotecas que tienen este material…

Detalles

Tipo de documento: Artículo
Todos autores / colaboradores: NB Alexander Afiliación: Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. nalexand@umich.edu; MM Gross; JL Medell; MR Hofmeyer
ISSN:1079-5006
Nota del idioma: English
Identificador único: 117698727
Premios:

Resumen:

BACKGROUND: Difficulty in rising from a chair is common in older adults and may be assessed by examining the biomechanics of the rise. The purposes of this study were (i) to analyze the biomechanics of rise performance during chair-rise tasks with varying task demand in older adults with varying rise ability and (ii) to determine whether a strength-training program might improve chair-rise success and alter chair-rise biomechanics, particularly under situations of increased task demand. METHODS: A training group (n = 16; mean age, 82 years) completed a 12-week strength-training regimen while a control group (n = 14; mean age, 84 years) participated in a seated flexibility program. Outcomes included the ability to complete seven chair-rise tasks, and, if the chair-rise tasks were successful, the biomechanics of these rises. Chair-rise task demand was increased by lowering the seat height, restricting the use of hands, increasing rise speed, and limiting foot support. RESULTS: At baseline, increased chair-rise task demand generally required increased task completion time, increased anterior center of pressure (COP) placement, increased momentum, increased hip flexion, and increased hip and knee torque output. Those unable to rise at 100% knee height without the use of their hands (task NH-100), compared with those able to rise during task NH-100, followed this pattern in requiring increased time, more anterior placement of the COP, and increased hip flexion to rise in the least demanding tasks allowing the use of hands. However, the unable subjects generated less momentum and knee torque in these tasks. At 12 weeks, and compared with baseline and controls, the training group demonstrated changes in chair-rise biomechanics but no significant changes in rise success. The training subjects, as compared with the controls, maintained a more posterior COP, increased their vertical and horizontal momentum, maintained their knees in greater extension, and maintained their knee-torque output. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that subtle yet significant changes can be demonstrated in chair-rise performance as a result of a controlled resistance-training program. These biomechanical changes may represent a shift away from impairment in chair-rise ability, and, although the changes are small, they represent how training may reduce rise difficulty.

Reseñas

Reseñas contribuidas por usuarios
Recuperando reseñas de GoodReads…
Recuperando reseñas de DOGObooks…

Etiquetas

Todas las etiquetas de usuarios (1)

Ver etiquetas más populares como: lista de etiquetas | nube de etiquetas

  • Read  (por 1 persona)
Confirmar este pedido

Ya ha pedido este material. Escoja OK si desea procesar el pedido de todos modos.

Datos enlazados


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/117698727>
library:oclcnum"117698727"
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/117698727>
rdf:typeschema:Article
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2001-09"
schema:description"RESULTS: At baseline, increased chair-rise task demand generally required increased task completion time, increased anterior center of pressure (COP) placement, increased momentum, increased hip flexion, and increased hip and knee torque output. Those unable to rise at 100% knee height without the use of their hands (task NH-100), compared with those able to rise during task NH-100, followed this pattern in requiring increased time, more anterior placement of the COP, and increased hip flexion to rise in the least demanding tasks allowing the use of hands. However, the unable subjects generated less momentum and knee torque in these tasks. At 12 weeks, and compared with baseline and controls, the training group demonstrated changes in chair-rise biomechanics but no significant changes in rise success. The training subjects, as compared with the controls, maintained a more posterior COP, increased their vertical and horizontal momentum, maintained their knees in greater extension, and maintained their knee-torque output."
schema:description"BACKGROUND: Difficulty in rising from a chair is common in older adults and may be assessed by examining the biomechanics of the rise. The purposes of this study were (i) to analyze the biomechanics of rise performance during chair-rise tasks with varying task demand in older adults with varying rise ability and (ii) to determine whether a strength-training program might improve chair-rise success and alter chair-rise biomechanics, particularly under situations of increased task demand."
schema:description"CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that subtle yet significant changes can be demonstrated in chair-rise performance as a result of a controlled resistance-training program. These biomechanical changes may represent a shift away from impairment in chair-rise ability, and, although the changes are small, they represent how training may reduce rise difficulty."
schema:description"METHODS: A training group (n = 16; mean age, 82 years) completed a 12-week strength-training regimen while a control group (n = 14; mean age, 84 years) participated in a seated flexibility program. Outcomes included the ability to complete seven chair-rise tasks, and, if the chair-rise tasks were successful, the biomechanics of these rises. Chair-rise task demand was increased by lowering the seat height, restricting the use of hands, increasing rise speed, and limiting foot support."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/233504846>
schema:isPartOf
<http://worldcat.org/issn/1079-5006>
rdf:typeschema:Periodical
schema:name"The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences"
schema:isPartOf
schema:name"Effects of functional ability and training on chair-rise biomechanics in older adults."
schema:pageStart"M538"
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Cerrar ventana

Inicie una sesión con WorldCat 

¿No tienes una cuenta? Puede fácilmente crear una cuenta gratuita.