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The eighth book of Mr. Jeremiah Burroughs : being a treatise of the evil of evils, or the exceeding sinfulness of sin ...

Author: Jeremiah Burroughs; Don Kistler
Publisher: Morgan, PA : Soli Deo Gloria Publications, ©1992.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Genre/Form: Controversial literature
Sermons
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jeremiah Burroughs; Don Kistler
ISBN: 1877611484 9781877611483
OCLC Number: 26236216
Notes: Originally published: London : Published by Thomas Goodwyn, William Bridge, Sydrach Sympson, William Adderly, William Greenhil, Philip Nue, John Yates : Printed by Peter Cole, 1654.
"This Soli Deo Gloria reprint, in which stylistic and spelling changes have been made, is copyright 1992"--Title page verso.
Description: xix, 345 pages ; 23 cm
Contents: Part One --
I. It's very evil choose to choose sin rather than affliction --
II. The servants of God have chosen the most dreadful afflictions rather than the least sin --
III. There is some good affliction, but none is sin --
1. no good of entity --
2. no good of causality --
3. no good principle from whence sin can come --
4. no good annexed unto afflictions --
a. of promise --
b. of evidence --
c. of blessing --
5. Also five different workings of the hearts of the saints under sin and under affliction; it's not capable of any good --
a. Add all the good to sin that all the creatures in heaven and earth have, yet it cannot make sin good --
b. Good ends cannot make sin good --
i. to help against temptations --
ii. to do good to others --
iii. to glorify God --
c. God cannot make sin good --
6. it's not comparatively good. IV. Uses, and nine consequences of excellent use --
1. Sin is not the work of God --
2. Sin's promises are all delusions --
3. Sin cannot be the object of a rational creature --
4. Nothing that's good should be ventured for sin --
5. Nothing that's good is to be serviceable for sin --
6. The mistake of making sin the chief good --
7. Time spent in sin is lost --
8. The wicked members are useless members --
9. Sin needs no debate it is to be done or not --
V. There is more evil in the least sin than in the greatest affliction opened in six particulars, being the general scope of the whole treatise --
VI. Sin is the most opposite to God, the Chief Good opened in four heads --
1. Sin is most opposite to God's nature --
2. Sin is opposite in its working against God --
3. Sin wrong God more than anything else --
4. Sin strikes at God's being. VII. Sin in itself is opposite to God --
1. Nothing is directly contrary to God but sin --
2. God would cease to be God if but one drop of sin was in Him --
3. Sin is opposite to God that He would cease to be God if He did but cause sin to be in another --
4. He would cease to be God if He approved of sin in others --
5. Sin would cause God to cease to be if He did not hate sin as much as He does --
VIII. The workings of sin are always against God --
1. enmity --
2. walking contrary --
3. fighting --
4. resisting --
5. striving --
6. rising against God --
IX. Now sin resists God in that --
1. it's a hating of God --
2. it's rebellion against God --
3. it's a despising of God --
X. 1. Sin is a striking against God --
a. The sinner wishes God were not as holy --
b. It seeks the destruction of God --
2. sin is a wronging of God. XI. How sin is wrong in His attributes --
1. His all-sufficiency, showed in two particulars --
2. it wrongs His omnipresence and omniscience --
3. sin wrongs His wisdom --
4. sin wrongs His holiness --
5. sin wrongs God in setting man's will above God --
6. sin wrongs God's dominion --
7. sin wrongs God's justice --
8. sin wrongs God in His truth --
XII. How sin is wrong in the relation between Father, Son, and Holy Ghost --
XIII. How sin is wrong in His counsels in setting that order in the world that He has set --
XIV. How sin is wrong in the end for which God gad done all He has done --
XV. The First Corollary: it appears by this that but few men know what they do when they sin against God --
XVI. The second corollary: the necessity of our Mediator being God and man --
XVII. The thirs corollary: few are humbled for sin as they should be --
1. it will not be deep enough unless it is for sin as being against God --
2. it will not sanctify the name of God --
3. it will not be lasting --
4. otherwise it will never make a divorce between sin and the soul. XVIII. The Fourth Corollary: admire the patience of God in seeing so much sin in the world and yet bearing it --
XIX. The fifth corollary: hence see a way to break your hearts for sin, also, to keep you from temptation --
XX. A sixth corollary: id sin is this sinful, it should teach us not only to be troubled for our sins, but for the sins of others --
XXI. A seventh corollary: if sin does so much against God, then see why God manifests as much sore displeasure against sin as He does --
1. against the angles who sinned --
2. against all Adam's posterity --
3. see in it God's giving the Law against sin --
4. see in it God's punishing sins that are accounted as small --
5. see it in God's destroying all the world for sin --
6. see His displeasure in punishing sin eternally. XXIII. A seventh discovery of God's displeasure against sin opened from the sufferings of Christ --
1. The various expression of Scripture --
a. He was sorrowful to death --
b. He began to be amazed --
c. He began to be in agony --
2. The Effects of Christ being in agony --
a. He fell groveling on the ground --
b. He sweat drops of blood --
3. He cries to God, "If it be possible, let this cup pass from Me" --
3. Eight considerations of Christ's sufferings --
The Second Part: Sin is most opposite to man's good, and far more opposite to the good of man than affliction --
XXIV. Sin makes a man evil, but no affliction can make him so --
a. those who are in affliction are not the worse --
b. but those who are wicked are vile persons, though they are the greatest princes --
XXV. Sin is more opposite to the good of man than afflictions because it is most opposite to the image of God in man --
three particulars instances and a question resolved. XXVI. Sin is opposite to the life of God in man --
XXVII. Sin is most opposite to man's good because it is most opposite to the last end for which man was made --
XXVIII. Sin is more opposite to man's good than affliction because it is a defilement of the soul --
1. it defiles all a man meddles with --
2. sin is the matter the worm shall gnaw upon to all eternity --
XXIX. Sin is more opposed to man's good than affliction because sin is the object of God's hatred; but God does not hate anyone for affliction --
XXX. Sin is more opposed to man's good than affliction because sin brings built upon the soul --
XXXI. Sin I a greater evil to man than affliction because it is that which put the creature under the sentence of condemnation --
XXXII. Sin is a greater evil to man than affliction because it breaks the union between God and the soul --
XXXIII. Sin is more against man's good than affliction for it stirs up all in God to come against a sinner in a way of enmity --
XXXIV. Sin is more opposed to man's good than affliction for that sin makes all the creature of God at enmity with a sinner. XXXV. Sin is a greater evil to man than affliction because it puts a man under the curse of God --
XXXVI. Sin is the seed of eternal evil, therefore it is more harmful to man than affliction --
1. see that those men are deceived who think to provide well for themselves by sin --
2. the ministry of the Word is for our good as well as for God's glory --
XXXVII. Sin is worse than affliction because it hardens the heart against God and the means of grace --
XXXVIII. Sin is worse to us than affliction because sin brings more shame than affliction --
XXXIX. He who sins wrongs, despises, and hates his own soul --
1. the malicious that sin is --
2. to pity those who go on in sinful ways --
3. let sin be dealt harshly with. The Third Part --
XL. Sin is opposite to all good and, therefore, a greater evil than any affliction --
1. sin takes away the excellency of all things --
2. it brings a curse upon all --
3. sin is a burden to heaven, earth, and all creatures --
4. sin turns the good into greatest evil --
5. sin, if let alone, would bring all things to confusion --
The Fourth Part --
XLI. That sin is the evil and poison of all other evils shown in several particulars --
1. it's the strength of all evils --
2. it's the sting of affliction --
3. it's the curse of all evils opened in five particulars --
4. sin is the shame of all evils --
5. the eternity of all comes from sin. The Fifth part --
XLII. Sin has a kind of infiniteness in it opened in seven particular --
1. because nothing but an infinite power can overcome it --
2. sin has a kind of infiniteness because it has an infinite desert in it expressed --
a. the desert of the loss of an infinite God --
b. it deserves to put an infinite distance between you and God --
c. it deserves infinite misery --
3. sin has a kind of infinite evil because and infinite price id requires to make an atonement between god and man --
4. there is a kind of infinite evil in sin because we must hate it infinitely --
5. sin is an infinite evil because it is the universal cause of all evil --
6, the Scripture makes use of evil things to set out the evil of sin --
7. There's an infiniteness in sin because the Scripture sets out sin by sin itself. The Sixth Part --
XLIII. Sin makes a man comfortable to the devil --
1. sin is of the same nature as the devil --
2. sin is from the devil --
3. sin is a furtherance of the devil's kingdom in the world --
a. by sin we oppose Christ's destroying the devil's kingdom in the world --
b. by sin you oppose your prayers when you pray, "thy kingdom come;" --
c. by going on in a way of sin, you become guilty of all the sin in the world --
4. sinning is fulfilling the will of the devil --
5. sin sells the soul t the devil --
6. sin turns the soul into a devil --
Corollaries and Consequences from All the Former Particulars --
XLIV. The first corollary: it is worse for a man to be sinful than to be turned into a beast --
XLV. The second corollary: it is worse to be sinful than to be afflicted with temptation from the devil --
XLVI. The third corollary: it's worse to be under sin than to be haunted by the devil --
XLVII. The fourth corollary: it's worse to be given up to any way of sin than to be given up to the devil --
How can the delivering up to Satan be for the saving of the soul? --
XLVIII. The fifth corollary: it's worse to be given up to one sin than to actually be possessed by the devil. XLIX. The sixth corollary: sin brings to wicked men the same portions the devils have --
L. To show that trouble of conscience for sin is another manner of business than melancholy or timidity --
LI. The former use further prosecuted --
1. against those who have light thoughts of trouble of conscience which arises either from gross ignorance, atheism, or desperate slighting of God --
2. trouble of conscience is the beginning of eternal death --
3. those who have slight thoughts of trouble of conscience can never prize Christ --
4. those who have slight thoughts of trouble of conscience now shall one day alter their opinion --
5. it would be just with God to let those sink under the burden of conscience who have light thoughts of trouble of conscience now shall one day alter their opinion --
5. it would be just with God to let those sink under the burden who have slight thoughts of it now --
6. those who have slight thoughts of trouble of conscience, those very thoughts take away a chief restraint from sin --
7. slight thoughts of trouble of conscience for sin are --
a. a high degree of blasphemy --
b. a degree towards the unpardonable sin. LII. Six differences between melancholy and trouble of conscience --
1. melancholy may be in those who are most grossly ignorant, but trouble of conscience comes with some enlightening works --
2. melancholy prevails of man by degrees, but trouble of conscience comes many times suddenly as lightning --
3. melancholy trouble is exceedingly confused, but trouble of conscience are more distinct --
4. the more melancholy anyone has, the less able they are to be bear outward affliction, but the more trouble of conscience, the more able to bear outward affliction --
5. melancholy puts a dullness upon the spirits of men, but trouble of conscience for sin puts a mighty activity upon men's spirits --
6. trouble of conscience cannot be cured the ways melancholy can --
LIII. A second use from the whole treatise, showing that a man may be in a most miserable condition, though he is delivered from outward affliction --
1. if a man is prosperous by sin, if a man raises himself to a prosperous condition by any sinful way, let this man consider --
a. what is gotten by sin costs greatly --
b. what is gotten by sin is accursed to you --
c. what is gotten by sin must be cast away or your soul is cast away --
2. when men come to be more sinful by their prosperity --
a. when prosperity is fuel from their sins --
b. when it gives men further liberty to sin --
c. when it hardens men in sin. LIV. If there is so much evil in sin, then it's a mighty mercy to get the pardon of sin --
LV. If there is so much evil in sin, this justifies the strictness and care of God's people against sin --
Two directions to those who make conscience of small sins --
1. be even in your ways; be strict against all sin --
2. be very yielding in all lawful things --
LVI. If there is so much evil in sin, then the dreadful things spoken in the Word against sinners are justified --
LVII. If there is so much evil in sin, it shows the miserable condition of those hearts and lives are filled with sin --
LVIII. If there is so much evil in sin, how dreadful a thing it is for men or women to delight in sin --
LIX. If there is so much evil in sin, then every soul is to be humbled for sin. LX. If there is so much evil in sin, this should be a loud cry to stop men and turn them from sin --
LXI. If there is so much evil in sin, then turn to Christ and bless God for Christ --
LXII. If there is so much evil in sin, then it is of great concern to be religious early and, thereby, prevent much sin --
LIII. If there is so much evil in sin, then it is a fearful thing for any to be instrumental in drawing others to sin --
LIV. If there is so much evil in sin, then there ought to be no pleading for sin --
LXV. If there is so much evil in sin, them of all judgments, spiritual judgments are the greatest --
LXVI. If there is more evil in sin than in affliction, then when sin and affliction meet, they make a man most miserable. LXVII. Being of reprehension to six sorts of people --
1. it reprehends those who are more afraid of affliction than sin --
2. it reprehends those who are more careful to keep themselves from sin, but merely for fear of affliction --
a. this may be without change of nature --
b. your obedience is forced --
c. you are not released from yourself --
d. you are not likely to hold out --
two answers to an objection of those who think they avoid sin for fear of hell --
a. your sensitive part may be most stirred by fear, but yet your rational part may be most carried against sin as sin --
b. those who avoid sin merely for fear never come to love the command that forbids the sin --
c. they are ignorant of many sins --
d. those who avoid sin and not out of fear, even when they fear God will destroy them, then they desire that God may be glorified --
e. those who avoid sin out of fear do not see the excellency of godliness so as to be enamored with it --
3. it reprehends those who will sin to avoid affliction --
4. it rebukes those who, when they are under affliction, are more sensible of affliction than of sin --
Also, there are five discoveries whether men's afflictions or sins trouble them --
5. it reprehends those who get out of affliction be sinful courses, and yet think they are doing well --
6. it reprehends those who, after being delivered from affliction. Can bless themselves in their sin.
Other Titles: Treatise of the evil of evils.
Evil of evils.
Exceeding sinfulness of sin.
Responsibility: edited by Don Kistler.

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   schema:description "The Sixth Part -- XLIII. Sin makes a man comfortable to the devil -- 1. sin is of the same nature as the devil -- 2. sin is from the devil -- 3. sin is a furtherance of the devil's kingdom in the world -- a. by sin we oppose Christ's destroying the devil's kingdom in the world -- b. by sin you oppose your prayers when you pray, "thy kingdom come;" -- c. by going on in a way of sin, you become guilty of all the sin in the world -- 4. sinning is fulfilling the will of the devil -- 5. sin sells the soul t the devil -- 6. sin turns the soul into a devil -- Corollaries and Consequences from All the Former Particulars -- XLIV. The first corollary: it is worse for a man to be sinful than to be turned into a beast -- XLV. The second corollary: it is worse to be sinful than to be afflicted with temptation from the devil -- XLVI. The third corollary: it's worse to be under sin than to be haunted by the devil -- XLVII. The fourth corollary: it's worse to be given up to any way of sin than to be given up to the devil -- How can the delivering up to Satan be for the saving of the soul? -- XLVIII. The fifth corollary: it's worse to be given up to one sin than to actually be possessed by the devil."@en ;
   schema:description "XVIII. The Fourth Corollary: admire the patience of God in seeing so much sin in the world and yet bearing it -- XIX. The fifth corollary: hence see a way to break your hearts for sin, also, to keep you from temptation -- XX. A sixth corollary: id sin is this sinful, it should teach us not only to be troubled for our sins, but for the sins of others -- XXI. A seventh corollary: if sin does so much against God, then see why God manifests as much sore displeasure against sin as He does -- 1. against the angles who sinned -- 2. against all Adam's posterity -- 3. see in it God's giving the Law against sin -- 4. see in it God's punishing sins that are accounted as small -- 5. see it in God's destroying all the world for sin -- 6. see His displeasure in punishing sin eternally."@en ;
   schema:description "XXXV. Sin is a greater evil to man than affliction because it puts a man under the curse of God -- XXXVI. Sin is the seed of eternal evil, therefore it is more harmful to man than affliction -- 1. see that those men are deceived who think to provide well for themselves by sin -- 2. the ministry of the Word is for our good as well as for God's glory -- XXXVII. Sin is worse than affliction because it hardens the heart against God and the means of grace -- XXXVIII. Sin is worse to us than affliction because sin brings more shame than affliction -- XXXIX. He who sins wrongs, despises, and hates his own soul -- 1. the malicious that sin is -- 2. to pity those who go on in sinful ways -- 3. let sin be dealt harshly with."@en ;
   schema:description "XXIII. A seventh discovery of God's displeasure against sin opened from the sufferings of Christ -- 1. The various expression of Scripture -- a. He was sorrowful to death -- b. He began to be amazed -- c. He began to be in agony -- 2. The Effects of Christ being in agony -- a. He fell groveling on the ground -- b. He sweat drops of blood -- 3. He cries to God, "If it be possible, let this cup pass from Me" -- 3. Eight considerations of Christ's sufferings -- The Second Part: Sin is most opposite to man's good, and far more opposite to the good of man than affliction -- XXIV. Sin makes a man evil, but no affliction can make him so -- a. those who are in affliction are not the worse -- b. but those who are wicked are vile persons, though they are the greatest princes -- XXV. Sin is more opposite to the good of man than afflictions because it is most opposite to the image of God in man -- three particulars instances and a question resolved."@en ;
   schema:description "XI. How sin is wrong in His attributes -- 1. His all-sufficiency, showed in two particulars -- 2. it wrongs His omnipresence and omniscience -- 3. sin wrongs His wisdom -- 4. sin wrongs His holiness -- 5. sin wrongs God in setting man's will above God -- 6. sin wrongs God's dominion -- 7. sin wrongs God's justice -- 8. sin wrongs God in His truth -- XII. How sin is wrong in the relation between Father, Son, and Holy Ghost -- XIII. How sin is wrong in His counsels in setting that order in the world that He has set -- XIV. How sin is wrong in the end for which God gad done all He has done -- XV. The First Corollary: it appears by this that but few men know what they do when they sin against God -- XVI. The second corollary: the necessity of our Mediator being God and man -- XVII. The thirs corollary: few are humbled for sin as they should be -- 1. it will not be deep enough unless it is for sin as being against God -- 2. it will not sanctify the name of God -- 3. it will not be lasting -- 4. otherwise it will never make a divorce between sin and the soul."@en ;
   schema:description "XXVI. Sin is opposite to the life of God in man -- XXVII. Sin is most opposite to man's good because it is most opposite to the last end for which man was made -- XXVIII. Sin is more opposite to man's good than affliction because it is a defilement of the soul -- 1. it defiles all a man meddles with -- 2. sin is the matter the worm shall gnaw upon to all eternity -- XXIX. Sin is more opposed to man's good than affliction because sin is the object of God's hatred; but God does not hate anyone for affliction -- XXX. Sin is more opposed to man's good than affliction because sin brings built upon the soul -- XXXI. Sin I a greater evil to man than affliction because it is that which put the creature under the sentence of condemnation -- XXXII. Sin is a greater evil to man than affliction because it breaks the union between God and the soul -- XXXIII. Sin is more against man's good than affliction for it stirs up all in God to come against a sinner in a way of enmity -- XXXIV. Sin is more opposed to man's good than affliction for that sin makes all the creature of God at enmity with a sinner."@en ;
   schema:description "IV. Uses, and nine consequences of excellent use -- 1. Sin is not the work of God -- 2. Sin's promises are all delusions -- 3. Sin cannot be the object of a rational creature -- 4. Nothing that's good should be ventured for sin -- 5. Nothing that's good is to be serviceable for sin -- 6. The mistake of making sin the chief good -- 7. Time spent in sin is lost -- 8. The wicked members are useless members -- 9. Sin needs no debate it is to be done or not -- V. There is more evil in the least sin than in the greatest affliction opened in six particulars, being the general scope of the whole treatise -- VI. Sin is the most opposite to God, the Chief Good opened in four heads -- 1. Sin is most opposite to God's nature -- 2. Sin is opposite in its working against God -- 3. Sin wrong God more than anything else -- 4. Sin strikes at God's being."@en ;
   schema:description "LIV. If there is so much evil in sin, then it's a mighty mercy to get the pardon of sin -- LV. If there is so much evil in sin, this justifies the strictness and care of God's people against sin -- Two directions to those who make conscience of small sins -- 1. be even in your ways; be strict against all sin -- 2. be very yielding in all lawful things -- LVI. If there is so much evil in sin, then the dreadful things spoken in the Word against sinners are justified -- LVII. If there is so much evil in sin, it shows the miserable condition of those hearts and lives are filled with sin -- LVIII. If there is so much evil in sin, how dreadful a thing it is for men or women to delight in sin -- LIX. If there is so much evil in sin, then every soul is to be humbled for sin."@en ;
   schema:description "XLIX. The sixth corollary: sin brings to wicked men the same portions the devils have -- L. To show that trouble of conscience for sin is another manner of business than melancholy or timidity -- LI. The former use further prosecuted -- 1. against those who have light thoughts of trouble of conscience which arises either from gross ignorance, atheism, or desperate slighting of God -- 2. trouble of conscience is the beginning of eternal death -- 3. those who have slight thoughts of trouble of conscience can never prize Christ -- 4. those who have slight thoughts of trouble of conscience now shall one day alter their opinion -- 5. it would be just with God to let those sink under the burden of conscience who have light thoughts of trouble of conscience now shall one day alter their opinion -- 5. it would be just with God to let those sink under the burden who have slight thoughts of it now -- 6. those who have slight thoughts of trouble of conscience, those very thoughts take away a chief restraint from sin -- 7. slight thoughts of trouble of conscience for sin are -- a. a high degree of blasphemy -- b. a degree towards the unpardonable sin."@en ;
   schema:description "LII. Six differences between melancholy and trouble of conscience -- 1. melancholy may be in those who are most grossly ignorant, but trouble of conscience comes with some enlightening works -- 2. melancholy prevails of man by degrees, but trouble of conscience comes many times suddenly as lightning -- 3. melancholy trouble is exceedingly confused, but trouble of conscience are more distinct -- 4. the more melancholy anyone has, the less able they are to be bear outward affliction, but the more trouble of conscience, the more able to bear outward affliction -- 5. melancholy puts a dullness upon the spirits of men, but trouble of conscience for sin puts a mighty activity upon men's spirits -- 6. trouble of conscience cannot be cured the ways melancholy can -- LIII. A second use from the whole treatise, showing that a man may be in a most miserable condition, though he is delivered from outward affliction -- 1. if a man is prosperous by sin, if a man raises himself to a prosperous condition by any sinful way, let this man consider -- a. what is gotten by sin costs greatly -- b. what is gotten by sin is accursed to you -- c. what is gotten by sin must be cast away or your soul is cast away -- 2. when men come to be more sinful by their prosperity -- a. when prosperity is fuel from their sins -- b. when it gives men further liberty to sin -- c. when it hardens men in sin."@en ;
   schema:description "The Third Part -- XL. Sin is opposite to all good and, therefore, a greater evil than any affliction -- 1. sin takes away the excellency of all things -- 2. it brings a curse upon all -- 3. sin is a burden to heaven, earth, and all creatures -- 4. sin turns the good into greatest evil -- 5. sin, if let alone, would bring all things to confusion -- The Fourth Part -- XLI. That sin is the evil and poison of all other evils shown in several particulars -- 1. it's the strength of all evils -- 2. it's the sting of affliction -- 3. it's the curse of all evils opened in five particulars -- 4. sin is the shame of all evils -- 5. the eternity of all comes from sin."@en ;
   schema:description "LX. If there is so much evil in sin, this should be a loud cry to stop men and turn them from sin -- LXI. If there is so much evil in sin, then turn to Christ and bless God for Christ -- LXII. If there is so much evil in sin, then it is of great concern to be religious early and, thereby, prevent much sin -- LIII. If there is so much evil in sin, then it is a fearful thing for any to be instrumental in drawing others to sin -- LIV. If there is so much evil in sin, then there ought to be no pleading for sin -- LXV. If there is so much evil in sin, them of all judgments, spiritual judgments are the greatest -- LXVI. If there is more evil in sin than in affliction, then when sin and affliction meet, they make a man most miserable."@en ;
   schema:description "VII. Sin in itself is opposite to God -- 1. Nothing is directly contrary to God but sin -- 2. God would cease to be God if but one drop of sin was in Him -- 3. Sin is opposite to God that He would cease to be God if He did but cause sin to be in another -- 4. He would cease to be God if He approved of sin in others -- 5. Sin would cause God to cease to be if He did not hate sin as much as He does -- VIII. The workings of sin are always against God -- 1. enmity -- 2. walking contrary -- 3. fighting -- 4. resisting -- 5. striving -- 6. rising against God -- IX. Now sin resists God in that -- 1. it's a hating of God -- 2. it's rebellion against God -- 3. it's a despising of God -- X. 1. Sin is a striking against God -- a. The sinner wishes God were not as holy -- b. It seeks the destruction of God -- 2. sin is a wronging of God."@en ;
   schema:description "Part One -- I. It's very evil choose to choose sin rather than affliction -- II. The servants of God have chosen the most dreadful afflictions rather than the least sin -- III. There is some good affliction, but none is sin -- 1. no good of entity -- 2. no good of causality -- 3. no good principle from whence sin can come -- 4. no good annexed unto afflictions -- a. of promise -- b. of evidence -- c. of blessing -- 5. Also five different workings of the hearts of the saints under sin and under affliction; it's not capable of any good -- a. Add all the good to sin that all the creatures in heaven and earth have, yet it cannot make sin good -- b. Good ends cannot make sin good -- i. to help against temptations -- ii. to do good to others -- iii. to glorify God -- c. God cannot make sin good -- 6. it's not comparatively good."@en ;
   schema:description "The Fifth part -- XLII. Sin has a kind of infiniteness in it opened in seven particular -- 1. because nothing but an infinite power can overcome it -- 2. sin has a kind of infiniteness because it has an infinite desert in it expressed -- a. the desert of the loss of an infinite God -- b. it deserves to put an infinite distance between you and God -- c. it deserves infinite misery -- 3. sin has a kind of infinite evil because and infinite price id requires to make an atonement between god and man -- 4. there is a kind of infinite evil in sin because we must hate it infinitely -- 5. sin is an infinite evil because it is the universal cause of all evil -- 6, the Scripture makes use of evil things to set out the evil of sin -- 7. There's an infiniteness in sin because the Scripture sets out sin by sin itself."@en ;
   schema:description "LXVII. Being of reprehension to six sorts of people -- 1. it reprehends those who are more afraid of affliction than sin -- 2. it reprehends those who are more careful to keep themselves from sin, but merely for fear of affliction -- a. this may be without change of nature -- b. your obedience is forced -- c. you are not released from yourself -- d. you are not likely to hold out -- two answers to an objection of those who think they avoid sin for fear of hell -- a. your sensitive part may be most stirred by fear, but yet your rational part may be most carried against sin as sin -- b. those who avoid sin merely for fear never come to love the command that forbids the sin -- c. they are ignorant of many sins -- d. those who avoid sin and not out of fear, even when they fear God will destroy them, then they desire that God may be glorified -- e. those who avoid sin out of fear do not see the excellency of godliness so as to be enamored with it -- 3. it reprehends those who will sin to avoid affliction -- 4. it rebukes those who, when they are under affliction, are more sensible of affliction than of sin -- Also, there are five discoveries whether men's afflictions or sins trouble them -- 5. it reprehends those who get out of affliction be sinful courses, and yet think they are doing well -- 6. it reprehends those who, after being delivered from affliction. Can bless themselves in their sin."@en ;
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