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Einstein and the bomb, revisited : Works & process at the Guggenheim

Author: Mary Sharp Cronson; Alan J Friedman; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.
Publisher: 2006.
Series: Works and process at the Guggenheim.
Edition/Format:   DVD video : NTSC color broadcast system : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Dr. Alan J. Friedman, director of the New York Hall of Science, revisits the story of Einstein and the discovery of atomic energy. Friedman imparts two famous stories associated with Einstein told at different periods in history. The first story describes the lone genius who stuck to his guns and the second declares the unpredictability of science. If saintly Einstein couldn't stop his beautiful idea from becoming a  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Video
Addresses
History
Named Person: Albert Einstein; Thomas C Chamberlin; Henri Becquerel; Marie Curie; Frederick Soddy; H G Wells; Otto Hahn; Lise Meitner; Otto Robert Frisch; John Cockcroft, Sir; Enrico Fermi; Irène Joliot-Curie; Frédéric Joliot-Curie; Robert A Heinlein; Leo Szilard; Henri Becquerel; Thomas C Chamberlin; John Cockcroft, Sir; Marie Curie; Albert Einstein; Enrico Fermi; Otto Robert Frisch; Otto Hahn; Robert A Heinlein; Frédéric Joliot-Curie; Irène Joliot-Curie; Lise Meitner; Frederick Soddy; Leo Szilard; H G Wells
Material Type: Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Mary Sharp Cronson; Alan J Friedman; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.
OCLC Number: 174572418
Performer(s): Host, Mary Sharp Cronson.
Event notes: Recorded as part of the Works & process performance series at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, on Feb. 27, 2006.
Description: 1 videodisc (NTSC) (78 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Series Title: Works and process at the Guggenheim.
Responsibility: [performance series producer, Mary Sharp Cronson].

Abstract:

Dr. Alan J. Friedman, director of the New York Hall of Science, revisits the story of Einstein and the discovery of atomic energy. Friedman imparts two famous stories associated with Einstein told at different periods in history. The first story describes the lone genius who stuck to his guns and the second declares the unpredictability of science. If saintly Einstein couldn't stop his beautiful idea from becoming a weapon that could destroy civilization, what hope is there for the rest of us? Friedman goes on to say that this image of the dangers of science is still with us today, but details the way in which this narrative is inaccurate and misleading. Friedman notes that it wasn't that Einstein discovered atomic energy, but it was atomic energy that gave Einstein hope that his equation could be proven correct. Friedman mentions some of the many scientists and authors who played a role in the discovery including: T. C. Chamberlin, Henri Becquerel, Marie Curie, Frederick Soddy, H. G. Wells, Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner, Otto Frisch, John Cockcroft, Enrico Fermi, Irene Curie, Frederick Jolio Curie, Robert Heinlein, and Leo Szilard. Friedman takes questions from the audience that include: How was the atom split? What lessons can be learned from this story that could be applied to global warming? What were Einstein's feelings about being associated with atomic energy? Are there feasible substitutes for oil as an energy source? How should the proliferation of nuclear weapons be prevented? How do we know how old the sun is? What has happened with cold fusion? and Would the history of the Cold War have been different if nuclear weapons had not been developed?

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