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Electrodynamics of metamaterials

Author: Andrey K Sarychev; Vladimir M Shalaev
Publisher: Singapore ; Hackensack, N.J. : World Scientific, ©2007.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Light is in a sense "one-handed" when interacting with atoms of conventional materials. This is because out of the two field components of light, electric and magnetic, only the electric "hand" efficiently probes the atoms of a material, whereas the magnetic component remains relatively unused because the interaction of atoms with the magnetic field component of light is normally weak. Metamaterials, i.e. artificial  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Sarychev, Andrey K.
Electrodynamics of metamaterials.
Singapore ; Hackensack, N.J. : World Scientific, 2007
(DLC) 2008530963
(OCoLC)191238804
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Andrey K Sarychev; Vladimir M Shalaev
ISBN: 9789812790996 9812790993 1281933651 9781281933652
OCLC Number: 262620873
Description: 1 online resource (xii, 247 pages) : illustrations
Contents: 1. Introduction. 1.1. Surface plasmon resonance. 1.2. Percolation threshold : singularities in metal-dielectric composites --
2. Conducting stick composites and left handed metamaterials. 2.1. Metamaterial. 2.2. Conductivity and dielectric constant : effective medium theory. 2.3. High-frequency response. 2.4. Giant enhancements of local electric fields. 2.5. Optical magnetism, left-handed optical materials and superresolution. 2.6. Planar nanowire composites --
3. Semicontinuous metal films. 3.1. Introduction. 3.2. Giant field fluctuations. 3.3. Localization of surface plasmons. 3.4. Anomalous light scattering from semicontinuous metal films. 3.5. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). 3.6. Giant enhancements of optical nonlinearities. 3.7. Percolation-enhanced nonlinear scattering : high harmonic generation --
4. Optical properties of metal-dielectric films : beyond quasistatic approximation. 4.1. Generalized Ohm's Law (GOL) and basic equations. 4.2. Transmittance, reflectance, and absorptance. 4.3. Numerical simulations of local electric and magnetic fields. 4.4. Spatial moments of local electric and magnetic fields. 4.5. Extraordinary Optical Transmittance (EOT) --
5. Electromagnetic properties of metal-dielectric crystals. 5.1. Metal-dielectric composites. 5.2. Electromagnetic crystals.
Responsibility: Andrey K. Sarychev, Vladimir M. Shalaev.

Abstract:

Light is in a sense "one-handed" when interacting with atoms of conventional materials. This is because out of the two field components of light, electric and magnetic, only the electric "hand" efficiently probes the atoms of a material, whereas the magnetic component remains relatively unused because the interaction of atoms with the magnetic field component of light is normally weak. Metamaterials, i.e. artificial materials with rationally designed properties, can enable the coupling of both of the field components of light to meta-atoms, enabling entirely new optical properties and exciting applications with such "two-handed" light. Among the fascinating properties is a negative refractive index. The refractive index is one of the most fundamental characteristics of light propagation in materials. Metamaterials with negative refraction may lead to the development of a superlens capable of imaging objects and their fine structures that are much smaller than the wavelength of light. Other exciting applications of metamaterials include novel antennae with superior properties, optical nano-lithography and nano-circuits, and "meta-coatings" that can make objects invisible. The word "meta" means "beyond" in Greek, and in this sense the name "metamaterials" refers to "beyond conventional materials". Metamaterials are typically man-made and have properties not available in nature. What is so magical about this simple merging of "meta" and "materials" that has attracted so much attention from researchers and has resulted in exponential growth in the number of publications in this area? The answer you can find in this book.

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