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Elementary flight dynamics with an introduction to bifurcation and continuation methods

Author: Nandan K Sinha; N Ananthkrishnan
Publisher: Boca Raton : CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, CRC Press is an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business, [2014]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Preface Flight mechanics lies at the heart of aeronautics. It is the point of confluence of other disciplines within aerospace engineering and the gateway to aircraft design. Almost every curriculum in aerospace engineering includes two courses in flight mechanics--one on applied aerodynamics and airplane performance and the other on airplane stability/control and flight dynamics. Having taught both these subjects  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Nandan K Sinha; N Ananthkrishnan
ISBN: 9781439886021 1439886024
OCLC Number: 731925128
Description: xvii, 354 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: IntroductionWhat, Why and How?Aircraft as a Rigid BodySix Degrees of FreedomPosition, Velocity and AnglesAircraft Motion in WindLongitudinal Flight DynamicsLongitudinal Dynamics EquationsA Question of TimescalesLongitudinal TrimAerodynamic Coefficients CD, CL, CmWing-Body TrimStability ConceptLinear First-Order SystemLinear Second-Order SystemNonlinear Second-Order SystemPitch Dynamics about Level Flight TrimModelling Small-Perturbation AerodynamicsPitch Dynamics about Level Flight Trim (Contd.)Short-Period Frequency and DampingForced ResponseResponse to Pitch ControlLongitudinal Trim and StabilityWing-Body Trim and StabilityWing-Body Plus Tail: Physical ArgumentsWing-Body Plus Tail: Math ModelRole of DownwashNeutral PointReplacing VH with VH / Effect of CG MovementRear CG Limit due to Airplane Loading and Configuration at Take-OffCm, CL Curves-Non-LinearitiesLongitudinal ControlAll-Moving TailElevatorTail Lift with ElevatorAirplane Lift Coefficient with ElevatorAirplane Pitching Moment Coefficient with ElevatorElevator Influence on Trim and StabilityLongitudinal Manoeuvres with the ElevatorMost Forward CG LimitNP Determination from Flight TestsEffect of NP Shift with Mach NumberLong-Period (Phugoid) DynamicsPhugoid Mode EquationsEnergyPhugoid Mode PhysicsPhugoid Small-Perturbation EquationsAerodynamic Modelling with Mach NumberPhugoid DynamicsPhugoid Mode Frequency and DampingAccurate Short-Period and Phugoid ApproximationsDerivative CmMaDerivative Cmq1 in Pitching MotionDerivative Cmq1 in Phugoid MotionFlow Curvature EffectsLateral-Directional MotionReviewDirectional Disturbance AnglesDirectional versus Longitudinal FlightLateral Disturbance AnglesLateral-Directional Rate VariablesSmall-Perturbation Lateral-Directional EquationsLateral-Directional TimescalesLateral-Directional Aerodynamic DerivativesLateral-Directional Small-Perturbation Equations (Contd.)........ 202Lateral-Directional Dynamics ModesLateral-Directional Dynamic ModesRoll (Rate) ModeRoll Damping Derivative Clp2Roll ControlAileron Control Derivative, ClδaYaw due to Roll ControlAileron Input for a Bank AngleDutch Roll ModeDirectional Derivatives CYss and CnssLateral Derivative: ClssDamping Derivatives: Cnr1 and Clr1Rudder ControlSpiral ModeReal-Life Airplane DataComputational Flight DynamicsAircraft Equations of MotionDerivation of Aircraft Equations of Motion3-2-1 RuleDerivation of Aircraft Equations of Motion (Contd.)Numerical Analysis of Aircraft MotionsStandard Bifurcation AnalysisExtended Bifurcation Analysis
Responsibility: Nandan K. Sinha, N. Ananthkrishnan.
More information:

Abstract:

"Preface Flight mechanics lies at the heart of aeronautics. It is the point of confluence of other disciplines within aerospace engineering and the gateway to aircraft design. Almost every curriculum in aerospace engineering includes two courses in flight mechanics--one on applied aerodynamics and airplane performance and the other on airplane stability/control and flight dynamics. Having taught both these subjects for over two decades, the authors' experience can be summed up briefly in the following student response: 'These are the best subjects in the curriculum. When you teach it in class, everything is obvious, but when we go back and read the textbook, things get very confusing'. As we got down to decoding this statement, several questions emerged: - Why put students through the gruesome derivation of the sixdegree- of-freedom equations early in the course, preceded by the axis transformations, and followed by the small perturbation math, when the bulk of the course is focussed on the dynamic modes about straight and level flight trim, which can be easily presented without going this route? - Would it not be nicer to write the equations for the second-order modes in a manner similar to a spring-mass-damper system? Then, one could read off the stiffness and damping directly, which would also give the conditions for stability. - The definitions of 'static' and 'dynamic' stability have been the cause of much student heartbreak. With the second-order form of the equations, the requirement of positive stiffness is the same as the socalled 'static' stability condition, so why not drop the separate notion of static stability entirely? -"--

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"Flight dynamics is a topic that can cause difficulties to aerospace engineering students. This text leads the reader gently through the material with plenty of practical examples and student Read more...

 
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