skip to content
Emiyenggal and Batjemal folk classifications, Cox Peninsula, Northern Territory: 'Figuring' continuity and contingency
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Emiyenggal and Batjemal folk classifications, Cox Peninsula, Northern Territory: 'Figuring' continuity and contingency

Author: Elizabeth Povinelli
Edition/Format: Article Article
Publication:Australian Aboriginal Studies, n2 (1990): 53-59
Database:Informit Indigenous Collection
Summary:
Although in 1957 Conklin outlined six general problems that ethnographers face when comparing cultural systems of categorising natural phenomena, the focus in the study of folk biological classifications has often centered on the hierarchical principles (or their lack) underlying classifications, rather than h ow various systems within a culture may be compared (Conklin 1957; Berlin 1976; Berlin, Breedlove and Raven  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

 

Find a copy online

Links to this journal/publication

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Elizabeth Povinelli
ISSN:0729-4352
Unique Identifier: 4956938574
Awards:

Abstract:

Although in 1957 Conklin outlined six general problems that ethnographers face when comparing cultural systems of categorising natural phenomena, the focus in the study of folk biological classifications has often centered on the hierarchical principles (or their lack) underlying classifications, rather than h ow various systems within a culture may be compared (Conklin 1957; Berlin 1976; Berlin, Breedlove and Raven 1973; Dwyer 1976; Hunn 1976; Kay 1971). Recently, Waddy has presented material that reviews these discussions and suggests new ways of assigning 'plants and animals to groups within a system of categories' from a system 'normally based on similarities in form and behavior to a system based on 'habitat' (my emphasis, Waddy 1983; see also 1988). Wadd/s review of the extant literature is comprehensive and illuminating; readers should refer to her work for a discussion of hierarchical principles in folk classification. I will look instead at how classifying natural phenomena is a practice intimately linked with another activity, loosely described as hunting and gathering, whose objects' location shifts and is recognised across classification schemata, surface boundaries and textual orders, and whose meaning itself is as central to the task as the meanings it uncovers.1 The continuance of hunting and gathering practices, in fact, depends upon these schemata's status as working categories which are both relatively stable and contingent.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/4956938574> # Emiyenggal and Batjemal folk classifications, Cox Peninsula, Northern Territory: 'Figuring' continuity and contingency
    a schema:Article, schema:CreativeWork ;
    library:oclcnum "4956938574" ;
    rdfs:comment "949 $l Journal Article" ;
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3977719522#Topic/aboriginal_australians_languages> ; # Aboriginal Australians Languages
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3977719522#Topic/aboriginal_australians_social_life_and_customs> ; # Aboriginal Australians Social life and customs
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3977719522#Topic/classification> ; # Classification
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3977719522#Topic/aboriginal_australians_food> ; # Aboriginal Australians Food
    schema:creator <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3977719522#Person/povinelli_elizabeth> ; # Elizabeth Povinelli
    schema:description "Although in 1957 Conklin outlined six general problems that ethnographers face when comparing cultural systems of categorising natural phenomena, the focus in the study of folk biological classifications has often centered on the hierarchical principles (or their lack) underlying classifications, rather than h ow various systems within a culture may be compared (Conklin 1957; Berlin 1976; Berlin, Breedlove and Raven 1973; Dwyer 1976; Hunn 1976; Kay 1971). Recently, Waddy has presented material that reviews these discussions and suggests new ways of assigning 'plants and animals to groups within a system of categories' from a system 'normally based on similarities in form and behavior to a system based on 'habitat' (my emphasis, Waddy 1983; see also 1988). Wadd/s review of the extant literature is comprehensive and illuminating; readers should refer to her work for a discussion of hierarchical principles in folk classification. I will look instead at how classifying natural phenomena is a practice intimately linked with another activity, loosely described as hunting and gathering, whose objects' location shifts and is recognised across classification schemata, surface boundaries and textual orders, and whose meaning itself is as central to the task as the meanings it uncovers.1 The continuance of hunting and gathering practices, in fact, depends upon these schemata's status as working categories which are both relatively stable and contingent." ;
    schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/3977719522> ;
    schema:isPartOf <http://worldcat.org/issn/0729-4352> ;
    schema:name "Emiyenggal and Batjemal folk classifications, Cox Peninsula, Northern Territory: 'Figuring' continuity and contingency" ;
    schema:pageStart "53" ;
    schema:pagination "n2 (1990): 53-59" ;
    schema:productID "4956938574" ;
    schema:url <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=158196481996994;res=IELIND> ;
    wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/4956938574> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3977719522#Person/povinelli_elizabeth> # Elizabeth Povinelli
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:name "Elizabeth Povinelli" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3977719522#Topic/aboriginal_australians_food> # Aboriginal Australians Food
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Aboriginal Australians Food" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3977719522#Topic/aboriginal_australians_languages> # Aboriginal Australians Languages
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Aboriginal Australians Languages" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3977719522#Topic/aboriginal_australians_social_life_and_customs> # Aboriginal Australians Social life and customs
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Aboriginal Australians Social life and customs" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/issn/0729-4352>
    a schema:Periodical ;
    rdfs:label "Australian Aboriginal Studies" ;
    schema:issn "0729-4352" ;
    .

<http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/4956938574>
    a genont:InformationResource, genont:ContentTypeGenericResource ;
    schema:about <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/4956938574> ; # Emiyenggal and Batjemal folk classifications, Cox Peninsula, Northern Territory: 'Figuring' continuity and contingency
    schema:dateModified "2017-08-21" ;
    void:inDataset <http://purl.oclc.org/dataset/ielind_indg> ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.