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Empire of the stars : friendship, obsession and betrayal in the quest for black holes

Author: Arthur I Miller
Publisher: London : Abacus, 2006.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"August 1930, on a voyage from Madras to London, a young Indian looked up at the stars and contemplated their fate. Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar - Chandra, as he was called - calculated that certain stars would suffer a strange and violent death, collapsing to virtually nothing. This extraordinary claim, the first mathematical description of black holes, brought Chandra into direct conflict with Sir Arthur Eddington,
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Genre/Form: Biography
Named Person: S Chandrasekhar; Arthur Stanley Eddington, Sir
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Arthur I Miller
ISBN: 034911627X 9780349116273
OCLC Number: 225087521
Awards: Shortlisted for Aventis General Prize for Science Books 2006.
Description: xiv, 400 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 20 cm.
Contents: 1. Fatal collision --
2. A journey between two worlds --
3. Rival giants of astrophysics --
4. Stellar buffoonery --
5. Into the crucibles of nature --
6. Eddington's discontents --
7. American adventure --
8. An era ends --
9. How stars shine and how they die --
10. Supernovae in the heavens and on earth --
11. How the unthinkable became thinkable --
12. The jaws of darkness --
13. Shuddering before the beautiful --
14. Into a black hole --
App. A. The ongoing tale of Sirius B --
App. B. Updating the supernova story.
Responsibility: Arthur I. Miller.

Abstract:

"Fermats last theorem" meets "The fly in the Cathedral" -- a compelling story of one of the 20th century's most important intellectual duels.  Read more...

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A fascinating book ... a well-researched chronicle of how powerful intellects confronted some of the most fascinating challenges in the world of science - and how they confronted each other as well Read more...

 
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