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Empire, public goods, and the Roosevelt corollary

Author: Marc D Weidenmier; Kris James Mitchener; National Bureau of Economic Research.
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : National Bureau of Economic Research, ©2004.
Series: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. 10729.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"The Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine marked a turning point in American foreign policy. In 1904, President Roosevelt announced that, not only were European powers not welcome in the Americas, but that the U.S. had the right to intervene in the affairs of Central American and Caribbean countries that were unstable and did not pay their debts. We use this change in U.S. policy to test Kindleberger's  Read more...
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Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Marc D Weidenmier; Kris James Mitchener; National Bureau of Economic Research.
OCLC Number: 56821657
Notes: "August 2004."
Description: 1 online resource (46, [8] pages) : illustrations.
Series Title: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. 10729.
Responsibility: Marc D. Weidenmier, Kris James Mitchener.

Abstract:

"The Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine marked a turning point in American foreign policy. In 1904, President Roosevelt announced that, not only were European powers not welcome in the Americas, but that the U.S. had the right to intervene in the affairs of Central American and Caribbean countries that were unstable and did not pay their debts. We use this change in U.S. policy to test Kindleberger's hypothesis that a hegemon can provide public goods such as increased financial stability and peace. Using a newly assembled database of weekly sovereign debt prices, we find that the average sovereign debt price for countries under the U.S. 'sphere of influence' rose by 74% in the year following the announcement of the policy. With the dramatic rise in bond prices, the threat of European intervention to support bondholder claims in the Western Hemisphere waned, and the U.S. was able to exert its role as regional hegemon. We find some evidence that the Corollary spurred export growth and better fiscal management by reducing conflict in the region, but it appears that debt settlements were driven primarily by gunboat diplomacy and the threat of lost sovereignty"--NBER website.

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