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Empire

Author: Michael Hardt; Antonio Negri
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Imperialism as we knew it may be no more, but Empire is alive and well. It is, as Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri demonstrate in this bold work, the new political order of globalization. Their book shows how this emerging Empire is fundamentally different from the imperialism of European dominance and capitalist expansion in previous eras. Rather, Today's Empire draws on elements of U.S. constitutionalism, with its  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Hardt, Michael, 1960-
Empire.
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2000
(OCoLC)606257586
Online version:
Hardt, Michael, 1960-
Empire.
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2000
(OCoLC)606364287
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Michael Hardt; Antonio Negri
ISBN: 0674251210 9780674251212 0674006712 9780674006713
OCLC Number: 41967081
Notes: Continued by: Multitude.
Description: xvii, 478 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: pt. 1. The Political Constitution of the Present. 1.1. World Order. 1.2. Biopolitical Production. 1.3. Alternatives within Empire --
pt. 2. Passages of Sovereignty. 2.1. Two Europes, Two Modernities. 2.2. Sovereignty of the Nation-State. 2.3. The Dialectics of Colonial Sovereignty. 2.4. Symptoms of Passage. 2.5. Network Power: U.S. Sovereignty and the New Empire. 2.6. Imperial Sovereignty --
Intermezzo: Counter-Empire --
pt. 3. Passage of Production. 3.1. The Limits of Imperialism. 3.2. Disciplinary Governability. 3.3. Resistance, Crisis, Transformation. 3.4. Postmodernization, or The Informatization of Production. 3.5. Mixed Constitution. 3.6. Capitalist Sovereignty, or Administering the Global Society of Control --
pt. 4. The Decline and Fall of Empire. 4.1. Virtualities. 4.2. Generation and Corruption. 4.3. The Multitude against Empire.
Responsibility: Michael Hardt, Antonio Negri.

Abstract:

This text identifies a radical shift in concepts that form the philosophical basis of modern politics, concepts such as sovereignty, nation and people - and links this philosophical transformation to  Read more...

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Stretching back nearly twenty years, Antonio Negri's work has been until recently one of the best-kept secrets of Marxist theory in the United States...["Empire"] is the culmination of Negri's Read more...

 
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schema:description"pt. 1. The Political Constitution of the Present. 1.1. World Order. 1.2. Biopolitical Production. 1.3. Alternatives within Empire -- pt. 2. Passages of Sovereignty. 2.1. Two Europes, Two Modernities. 2.2. Sovereignty of the Nation-State. 2.3. The Dialectics of Colonial Sovereignty. 2.4. Symptoms of Passage. 2.5. Network Power: U.S. Sovereignty and the New Empire. 2.6. Imperial Sovereignty -- Intermezzo: Counter-Empire -- pt. 3. Passage of Production. 3.1. The Limits of Imperialism. 3.2. Disciplinary Governability. 3.3. Resistance, Crisis, Transformation. 3.4. Postmodernization, or The Informatization of Production. 3.5. Mixed Constitution. 3.6. Capitalist Sovereignty, or Administering the Global Society of Control -- pt. 4. The Decline and Fall of Empire. 4.1. Virtualities. 4.2. Generation and Corruption. 4.3. The Multitude against Empire."@en
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schema:reviewBody""Imperialism as we knew it may be no more, but Empire is alive and well. It is, as Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri demonstrate in this bold work, the new political order of globalization. Their book shows how this emerging Empire is fundamentally different from the imperialism of European dominance and capitalist expansion in previous eras. Rather, Today's Empire draws on elements of U.S. constitutionalism, with its tradition of hybrid identities and expanding frontiers." "Empire identifies a radical shift in concepts that form the philosophical basis of modern politics, concepts such as sovereignty, nation, and people. Hardt and Negri link this philosophical transformation to cultural and economic changes in postmodern society - to new forms of racism, new conceptions of identity and difference, new networks of communication and control, and new paths of migration. They also show how the power of transnational corporations and the increasing predominance of postindustrial forms of labor and production help to define the new imperial global order." "More than analysis, Empire is also work of political philosophy, a new Communist Manifesto. Looking beyond the regimes of exploitation and control that characterize today's world order, it seeks an alternative political paradigm - the basis for a truly democratic global society."--Jacket."
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