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Empires of time : calendars, clocks, and cultures

Author: Anthony F Aveni
Publisher: London : Tauris Parke Paperbacks, 2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Empires of Time is one of the best books on a scientific theme for the serious general reader that I have read for some time. In this wide-ranging, intriguing journey across centuries, Aveni, As an anthropologist and astronomer known for his detailed work on the archaeo-astronomy of south and central American cultures, traces the modern calendar's roots back to Greek pastoral poetry and prehistoric African bone  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Anthony F Aveni
ISBN: 1860646026 9781860646027
OCLC Number: 45144264
Notes: Originally published: I.B. Tauris, 1990.
Description: ix, 371 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Contents: Introduction : our time- and theirs --
The basic rhythms --
Early time reckoning --
The Western calendar --
The year and its accumulation in history --
Tribal societies and lunar-social time --
The interlocking calendars of the Maya --
The Aztecs and the sun --
The Incas and their orientation calendar --
Eastern standard : time reckoning in China --
Building on the basic rhythms.
Responsibility: Anthony Aveni.

Abstract:

Empires of Time is one of the best books on a scientific theme for the serious general reader that I have read for some time. In this wide-ranging, intriguing journey across centuries, Aveni, As an anthropologist and astronomer known for his detailed work on the archaeo-astronomy of south and central American cultures, traces the modern calendar's roots back to Greek pastoral poetry and prehistoric African bone markings, then compares Western, Chinese, Maya, Inca and tribal time systems. He also fathoms our division of time into days, weeks, months, seasons and years for clues to our psychology and worldview. He notes that scientists who believe that previous universes existed before the Big Bang echo the Maya and Aztec view of time as cyclical.

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