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Empires

Author: Michael W Doyle
Publisher: Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, 1986.
Series: Cornell studies in comparative history.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The analysis of the causes and patterns of imperialism has long been a difficult academic exercise. . . . To structure this far-ranging phenomenon and arrange its course in a concise, interpretive essay takes pluck, if a good adjective from the derring-do novels of empire may be used here. Michael W. Doyle had that pluck and has succeeded remarkably well in his task. This is a splendid essay, an effective  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Doyle, Michael W., 1948-
Empires.
Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, 1986
(OCoLC)747303139
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Michael W Doyle
ISBN: 080149334X 9780801493348 0801417562 9780801417566
OCLC Number: 12668820
Description: 407 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1. Imperialism and Empire ----
I HISTORICAL SOCIOLOGY OF EMPIRES. 2. Introduction to Part I ---
3. Athens and Sparta: Empire and Hegemony ---
4. Rome ---
5. The Ottoman, Spanish, and English Empires ---
6. The Sociology of Empires: Hypotheses ----
II. THE SCRAMBLE FOR AFRICA: NINETEENTH-CENTURY IMPERIALISM. 7. Introduction to Part II ---
8. Tribal Peripheries and Formal Empire ---
9. Patrimonial Peripheries and Informal Empire ---
10. The International System and Nineteenth-Century ---
11. Greater Britain ---
12. France, Germany, and Spain ---
13. The Politics of Nineteenth-Century Imperialism ----
III. CONCLUSION. 14 Imperial Development: The End of Empire?
Series Title: Cornell studies in comparative history.
Responsibility: Michael W. Doyle.
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Abstract:

"The analysis of the causes and patterns of imperialism has long been a difficult academic exercise. . . . To structure this far-ranging phenomenon and arrange its course in a concise, interpretive essay takes pluck, if a good adjective from the derring-do novels of empire may be used here. Michael W. Doyle had that pluck and has succeeded remarkably well in his task. This is a splendid essay, an effective combination of broad historical analysis and well-presented theoretical assessments derived from the social sciences. The book will no doubt stand as one of the best contemporary syntheses of the progress of imperialism. . . . Doyle has read widely and well. He has mastered his material and has done with it something masterly: he has made the whole more than the sum of the parts. What follows next from the lively mind of this scholar will be pleasantly anticipated."-- American Historical Review.

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