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The end of advertising : why it had to die, and the creative resurrection to come

Author: Andrew Essex
Publisher: New York : Spiegel & Grau, 2017.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"One of the most successful admen of recent years throws down the ultimate challenge to his profession: innovate or perish. The ad apocalypse is upon us. Today millions are downloading ad-blocking software, and still more are paying subscription premiums to avoid ads. This $600 billion industry is now careening toward outright extinction, after having taken for granted a captive audience for too long, leading to
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Andrew Essex
ISBN: 9780399588518 0399588515
OCLC Number: 975173719
Description: 220 pages ; 20 cm
Contents: Adblockalypse now: The beginning of the end --
Advertising's origins: floating soap, snake oil, and smack --
The future of advertising: bikes, blocks, buildings, boats--
because adding value is everything.
Responsibility: Andrew Essex.

Abstract:

"One of the most successful admen of recent years throws down the ultimate challenge to his profession: innovate or perish. The ad apocalypse is upon us. Today millions are downloading ad-blocking software, and still more are paying subscription premiums to avoid ads. This $600 billion industry is now careening toward outright extinction, after having taken for granted a captive audience for too long, leading to lazy, overabundant, and frankly annoying ads. Make no mistake, Madison Avenue: Advertising as we know it is over. In this short, bound-to-be controversial manifesto, Essex offers both a wake-up call and a road map to the future. With trenchant wit and razor-sharp insights, he presents an essential new vision of where the smart businesses could be headed, to the cheers of advertisers and consumers alike"--

"He ad apocalypse is upon us. Today millions are downloading ad blocking software, and still more are paying subscription premiums to avoid them. This $600 billion industry is now careening toward outright extinction, after having taken for granted a captive audience for too long, leading to lazy, overabundant, and frankly annoying ads. Make no mistake, Madison Avenue: Advertising, as we know it, is over. In this short, controversial manifesto, Essex offers both a wake-up call and a road map to the future. With trenchant wit and razor sharp insights, he presents an essential new vision of where the smart businesses could be headed, to the cheers of advertisers and consumers alike. Andrew Essex ran what was generally considered to be the hottest shop in the industry. He is therefore uniquely qualified to report on the industry's demise--and what it must do to reinvent itself. He gives a brief and pungent history of the rise and fall of Adland--a story populated by snake-oil salesmen, slicksters, and search engine optimizers. But his book is no eulogy. Instead, he poses a bold challenge to global marketers to innovate their way into a better ad-free future. Rather than clutter our world, ambitious marketing campaigns could provide utility, services, gifts, investment, and even patronage of the arts and blockbuster entertainment. Ads could become so enticing that people would pay--yes, pay--to see them"--

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