skip to content
The end of Roman Britain Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The end of Roman Britain

Author: Michael E Jones
Publisher: Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 1996.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Britain was never as thoroughly conquered as traditional historians would have us believe, according to Michael E. Jones. Among the provinces long occupied by Rome, Britain retained the slightest imprint of the invading civilization. To explain why this was true, Jones offers a lucid and thorough analysis of the economic, social, military, and environmental problems that contributed to the failure of the Romans.  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Michael E Jones
ISBN: 0801427894 9780801427893
OCLC Number: 34029750
Description: ix, 323 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Responsibility: Michael E. Jones.

Abstract:

Britain was never as thoroughly conquered as traditional historians would have us believe, according to Michael E. Jones. Among the provinces long occupied by Rome, Britain retained the slightest imprint of the invading civilization. To explain why this was true, Jones offers a lucid and thorough analysis of the economic, social, military, and environmental problems that contributed to the failure of the Romans. Drawing on literary sources and on recent archaeological evidence, Jones disputes the theory that the Anglo-Saxon invasions were the determining agent in the failure of Romanitas. He argues instead that the success of the new warriors was a symptom of the inherent weakness of Romano-British society. Problems late in the era may have been worsened significantly by changes in the natural environment, such as climatic deterioration associated with harvest failure, famine, and changes in migration patterns.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/34029750>
library:oclcnum"34029750"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/34029750>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1996"
schema:description"Britain was never as thoroughly conquered as traditional historians would have us believe, according to Michael E. Jones. Among the provinces long occupied by Rome, Britain retained the slightest imprint of the invading civilization. To explain why this was true, Jones offers a lucid and thorough analysis of the economic, social, military, and environmental problems that contributed to the failure of the Romans. Drawing on literary sources and on recent archaeological evidence, Jones disputes the theory that the Anglo-Saxon invasions were the determining agent in the failure of Romanitas. He argues instead that the success of the new warriors was a symptom of the inherent weakness of Romano-British society. Problems late in the era may have been worsened significantly by changes in the natural environment, such as climatic deterioration associated with harvest failure, famine, and changes in migration patterns."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/20954260>
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The end of Roman Britain"@en
schema:numberOfPages"323"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.