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The end of the certain world : the life and science of Max Born : the Nobel physicist who ignited the quantum revolution

Author: Nancy Thorndike Greenspan
Publisher: New York : Basic Books, ©2005.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
""The world is not ruled by reason; even less by love," Max Born wrote to his his close friend Albert Einstein in 1921. Twelve years later, as the Nazis forced him to emigrate to Great Britain, he felt the personal impact of that statement. Even after the defeat of the Nazis, the explosion of the atom bomb inflicted a further blow. It was a cruel twist of fate that Born, a pacifist who loved science for its beauty,  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Biographies
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Greenspan, Nancy Thorndike.
End of the certain world.
New York : Basic Books, c2005
(OCoLC)607393849
Named Person: Max Born; Max Born; Max Born
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Nancy Thorndike Greenspan
ISBN: 0738206938 9780738206936
OCLC Number: 56534998
Description: x, 374 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: A kind of shell --
A higher desire --
Matters physical --
A bitter pill to swallow --
There is no other born in Germany --
Thinking hopelessly about Quanta --
But God does play dice --
Dark future --
Seeing how expendable you are --
Talking of desperate matters --
Worse than imagination --
There are so many ifs --
A curse of the age --
A trip to Stockholm.
Responsibility: Nancy Thorndike Greenspan.
More information:

Abstract:

""The world is not ruled by reason; even less by love," Max Born wrote to his his close friend Albert Einstein in 1921. Twelve years later, as the Nazis forced him to emigrate to Great Britain, he felt the personal impact of that statement. Even after the defeat of the Nazis, the explosion of the atom bomb inflicted a further blow. It was a cruel twist of fate that Born, a pacifist who loved science for its beauty, had educated the developers of the atom bomb. Robert Oppenheimer, Edward Teller, Eugene Wigner, and John von Neumann, among others, had flocked to Gottingen, Germany, to work with Born, the physicist who had discovered one of the most profound principles of the century - the physics of indeterminacy." "The End of the Certain World presents for the first time Born's full story: Nobel physicist, a discoverer of quantum theory, exile from Hitler's Germany, teacher of nine Nobel physicists. Born's role in the "Golden Age of Physics" in the 1920s helped to shape the science of the twentieth century and open the door to the modern era. Together with his Wunderkinder - including his assistant Werner Heisenberg - Born solved the quantum puzzle. But whereas Heisenberg received his Nobel Prize in 1933, Born wa.

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