skip to content
Entangled voices : genre and the religious construction of the self Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Entangled voices : genre and the religious construction of the self

Author: Frederick J Ruf
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In this book, Ruf tries to understand how the concepts of "voice" and "genre" function in texts. To this end, he joins literary theorists in the discussion about "narrative." Ruf rejects the idea of genre as a fixed historical form that serves as a template for readers and writers; instead, he suggests that we imagine different genres, whether narrative, lyric, or dramatic, as the expression of different voices.
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Ruf, Frederick J., 1950-
Entangled voices.
New York : Oxford University Press, 1997
(OCoLC)191952814
Named Person: John Donne; Robert Wilson; Philip Glass; Samuel Taylor Coleridge; Primo Levi; Primo Levi; John Donne; Robert Wilson; Samuel Taylor Coleridge; Primo Levi; Donne
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Frederick J Ruf
ISBN: 0195102630 9780195102635
OCLC Number: 35620299
Description: x, 125 p. ; 22 cm.
Contents: Introduction: hearing voices --
ch. 1. The voices of narrative, lyric, and drama: The three characteristics of narrative --
Lyric --
Drama --
ch. 2. "Jogona's great treasure": narrative, lyric, and dramatic intelligibility: Intelligibility: Comprehensiveness and cohesion --
Conclusions --
ch. 3. "Intoxicated with intimacy": the lyric voice in John Donne's Holy sonnets: Unruly autobiography --
Donne's Holy sonnets --
Donne's lyric self --
The lyric voice --
ch. 4. "The circle of chalk": narrative voice in Primo Levi's The periodic table: The periodic table --
The aspiration to narrative --
Narrative instability --
"The rich and messy domain" --
ch. 5. "Survival and distance": the dramatic voice in Robert Wilson's Einstein on the beach: Einstein on the beach --
Dramatic voice in Einstein --
The dramatic voice and religion --
The dramatic self --
ch.. 6. "Harmonized chaos": the mixed voice of Coleridge's Biographia literaria: The biographia literaria --
The form of the Biographia --
Dissociation, fragmentation, and incoherence --
Harmony and unity --
Ramifications: the "mixed" self --
ch. 7. Conclusion: genre and instability.
Responsibility: Frederick J. Ruf.
More information:

Abstract:

This work attempts to understand how the concepts of "voice" and "genre" function in texts, especially religious texts. The theory given is applied to five specific literary texts, detailing the ways  Read more...

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/35620299>
library:oclcnum"35620299"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/35620299>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2010110705>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Religious literature, English--History and criticism--Theory, etc."@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1358765>
rdf:typeschema:CreativeWork
schema:name"Biographia literaria (Coleridge, Samuel Taylor)"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1997"
schema:description"In this book, Ruf tries to understand how the concepts of "voice" and "genre" function in texts. To this end, he joins literary theorists in the discussion about "narrative." Ruf rejects the idea of genre as a fixed historical form that serves as a template for readers and writers; instead, he suggests that we imagine different genres, whether narrative, lyric, or dramatic, as the expression of different voices. Each voice, he asserts, possesses different key qualities: embodiment, sociality, contextuality, and opacity in the dramatic voice; intimacy, limitation, urgency in lyric; and a "magisterial" quality of comprehensiveness and cohesiveness in narrative. These voices are models for our selves, composing an unruly and unstable multiplicity of selves. Ruf applies his theory of "voice" and "genre" to five texts: Dineson's Out of Africa, Donne's Holy Sonnets, Primo Levi's The Periodic Table, Robert Wilson's Einstein on the Beach, and Coleridge's Biographia Literaria."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/793989925>
schema:genre"Criticism, interpretation, etc."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Entangled voices : genre and the religious construction of the self"@en
schema:numberOfPages"125"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.