skip to content
Ephraim London papers, 1940-1975. Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Ephraim London papers, 1940-1975.

Author: Ephraim London
Edition/Format:   Archival material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Ephraim London conducted many important First Amendment proceedings during his career. This collection contains substantial records relating to two of his best-known cases. It includes legal documents, clippings, correspondence, and courtroom notes from his 1964 defense of Lenny Bruce, the comedian. This series features letters between attorney and client, which follow the course of an increasingly uneasy
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: Lenny Bruce; Ephraim London; Henry Miller; Samuel Spewack; Bella Cohen Spewack
Document Type: Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Ephraim London
OCLC Number: 426032532
Description: 5.5 linear ft. (11 archival document boxes)
More information:

Abstract:

Ephraim London conducted many important First Amendment proceedings during his career. This collection contains substantial records relating to two of his best-known cases. It includes legal documents, clippings, correspondence, and courtroom notes from his 1964 defense of Lenny Bruce, the comedian. This series features letters between attorney and client, which follow the course of an increasingly uneasy relationship. In 1961, London represented Grove Press in its attempt to publish Henry Miller's "Tropic of Cancer". This collection includes correspondence, legal records, and trial notes from the case. It also features a huge collection of newspaper and magazine clippings related to the topic, which tracks the national debate on issues of censorship and obscenity during this period.

Beyond these two major cases, London's papers include records from his own research into legal and philosophical questions of obscenity and free speech. There are also files detailing his work on film censorship for Embassy Pictures during the early 1960s. At the time, local boards could request edits and prohibit movies from being shown in their jurisdiction. It was London's job to get the films - often the work of famed European auteurs - screened as they had been intended. Among other things, the correspondence here tracks a running, and increasingly exasperated, dialogue between the attorney and Kitty McMahon, of the Kansas State Board of Review, who always demanded the highest standards of cinematic decorum for her constituency.

Another aspect of London's career is also well represented in this collection. For years, he worked as an attorney for Simon and Schuster, the publishing company. Through correspondence, financial statements, meeting minutes, and distribution and sales contracts, his papers offer insights into the company's business practices during the 1950s and 1960s. Simon and Schuster's negotiations with other publishers, especially Pocket Books and Little Golden, are included in these papers. London was also responsible for vetting individual books for possible instances of libel, and handling any legal issues that arose after publication.

Records from other facets of London's work are absent from this collection. There is little here about his defense of Fifth Amendment cases. None of his personal writings, and few of the articles that he penned during his career, are present. The Lenny Bruce and "Tropic of Cancer" cases are well documented, but London's other major censorship cases are not represented.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/426032532>
library:oclcnum"426032532"
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/426032532>
rdf:typelibrary:ArchiveMaterial
rdf:typeschema:CreativeWork
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:description"Ephraim London conducted many important First Amendment proceedings during his career. This collection contains substantial records relating to two of his best-known cases. It includes legal documents, clippings, correspondence, and courtroom notes from his 1964 defense of Lenny Bruce, the comedian. This series features letters between attorney and client, which follow the course of an increasingly uneasy relationship. In 1961, London represented Grove Press in its attempt to publish Henry Miller's "Tropic of Cancer". This collection includes correspondence, legal records, and trial notes from the case. It also features a huge collection of newspaper and magazine clippings related to the topic, which tracks the national debate on issues of censorship and obscenity during this period."@en
schema:description"Another aspect of London's career is also well represented in this collection. For years, he worked as an attorney for Simon and Schuster, the publishing company. Through correspondence, financial statements, meeting minutes, and distribution and sales contracts, his papers offer insights into the company's business practices during the 1950s and 1960s. Simon and Schuster's negotiations with other publishers, especially Pocket Books and Little Golden, are included in these papers. London was also responsible for vetting individual books for possible instances of libel, and handling any legal issues that arose after publication."@en
schema:description"Records from other facets of London's work are absent from this collection. There is little here about his defense of Fifth Amendment cases. None of his personal writings, and few of the articles that he penned during his career, are present. The Lenny Bruce and "Tropic of Cancer" cases are well documented, but London's other major censorship cases are not represented."@en
schema:description"Beyond these two major cases, London's papers include records from his own research into legal and philosophical questions of obscenity and free speech. There are also files detailing his work on film censorship for Embassy Pictures during the early 1960s. At the time, local boards could request edits and prohibit movies from being shown in their jurisdiction. It was London's job to get the films - often the work of famed European auteurs - screened as they had been intended. Among other things, the correspondence here tracks a running, and increasingly exasperated, dialogue between the attorney and Kitty McMahon, of the Kansas State Board of Review, who always demanded the highest standards of cinematic decorum for her constituency."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/313953787>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Ephraim London papers,"@en
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.