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The etymologicon : a circular stroll through the hidden connections of the English language

Author: Mark Forsyth
Publisher: New York : Berkley Books, 2012.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : Berkley trade pbk. edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
An unauthorized guide to the underpinnings of the English language. Springing from writer and journalist Mark Forsyth's hugely popular blog The Inky Fool and including word-connection parlor games perfect for any word-lovers get-together, The Etymologicon is a brilliant map of the secret labyrinth that lurks beneath the English language. There's always a connection. Sometimes, it's obvious: an actor's role was once  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Mark Forsyth
ISBN: 9780425260791 0425260798
OCLC Number: 775418832
Description: xvii, 279 p. ; 20 cm.
Contents: A turn-up for the books --
A game of chicken --
Hydrogentlemanly --
The old and new testicle --
Parenthetical codpieces --
Suffering for my underwear --
Pans --
Miltonic meanders --
Bloody typical semantic shifts --
The proof of the pudding --
Sausage poison in your face --
Bows and arrows and cats --
Black and white --
Hat cheque point Charlie --
Sex and bread --
Concealed farts --
Wool --
Turkey --
Insulting foods --
Folk etymology --
Butterflies of the world --
Psychoanalysis and the release of the butterfly --
The villains of the language --
Two executioners and a doctor --
Thomas Crapper --
Mythical acronyms --
John the Baptist and The sound of music --
Organic, organised, organs --
Clipping --
Buffalo --
Antanaclasis --
China --
Coincidences and patterns --
Frankly, my dear frankfurter --
Beastly foreigners --
Pejoratives --
Ciao, slave driver --
Robots --
Terminators and prejudice --
Terminators and equators --
Equality In Ecuador --
Bogeys --
Bugbears and bedbugs --
Von Munchausen's computer --
SPAM (not spam) --
Heroin --
Morphing De Quincey and Shelley --
Star-spangled drinking songs --
Torpedoes and turtles --
From Mount Vernon to Portobello Road with a hangover --
A punch of drinks --
The scampering champion of the champagne campaign --
Insulting names --
Peter Pan --
Herbaceous communication --
Papa was a saxum volutum --
Flying Peters --
Venezuela and Venus and Venice --
What news on the Rialto? --
Magazines --
Dick Snary --
Autopeotomy --
Water closets for Russia --
Fat Gunhilda --
Queen Gunhilda and the gadgets --
Shell --
In a nutshell --
The Iliad --
The human body --
The five fingers --
Hoax bodies --
Bunking and debunking --
The Anglo-Saxon mystery --
The sedge-strewn stream and globalisation --
Coffee --
Cappuccino monks --
Called to the bar --
Ignorami --
Fossil-less --
The frequentative suffix --
Pending --
Worms and their turnings --
Mathematics --
Stellafied and oily beavers --
Beards --
Islands --
Sandwich Islands --
The French Revolution in English words --
Romance languages --
Peripatetic peoples --
From Bohemia to California (via Primrose Hill) --
California --
The hash guys --
Drugs --
Pleasing psalms --
Biblical errors --
Salt --
Halcyon days --
Dog days --
Cynical dogs --
Greek education and fastchild --
Cybermen --
Turning trix --
Amateur lovers --
Dirty money --
Death pledges --
Wagering war --
Strapped for cash --
Fast bucks and dead ones --
The buck stops here --
Back to Howth Castle and environs.
Responsibility: Mark Forsyth.

Abstract:

An unauthorized guide to the underpinnings of the English language. Springing from writer and journalist Mark Forsyth's hugely popular blog The Inky Fool and including word-connection parlor games perfect for any word-lovers get-together, The Etymologicon is a brilliant map of the secret labyrinth that lurks beneath the English language. There's always a connection. Sometimes, it's obvious: an actor's role was once written on a roll of parchment, and cappuccinos are the same colour as the robes of a Capuchin monk. Sometimes the connection is astonishing and a little more hidden: who would have guessed that your pants and panties are named after Saint Pantaleon, the all-compassionate?

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