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Everyone is entitled to my opinion

Author: David Brinkley
Publisher: New York : Knopf, 1996.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
No matter how seriously we take our politics, Americans love a light touch, a raised eyebrow, a generous chuckle - which is why millions of us tune in to Sunday morning television for the bracing cocktail of wit and practical wisdom dispensed, along with the news, by the inimitable David Brinkley. His closing remarks, like an exclamation point after each broadcast, may illuminate the week's events or they may range
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Brinkley, David.
Everyone is entitled to my opinion.
New York : Knopf, 1996
(OCoLC)605042911
Online version:
Brinkley, David.
Everyone is entitled to my opinion.
New York : Knopf, 1996
(OCoLC)607884824
Named Person: David Brinkley; David Brinkley
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: David Brinkley
ISBN: 0679450718 9780679450719
OCLC Number: 35746726
Description: xi, 175 p. ; 20 cm.
Responsibility: David Brinkley.
More information:

Abstract:

No matter how seriously we take our politics, Americans love a light touch, a raised eyebrow, a generous chuckle - which is why millions of us tune in to Sunday morning television for the bracing cocktail of wit and practical wisdom dispensed, along with the news, by the inimitable David Brinkley. His closing remarks, like an exclamation point after each broadcast, may illuminate the week's events or they may range widely through the oft-puzzling human condition - but.

They're always worth waiting for. In this one-of-a-kind book, we get the undiluted Brinkley. He marvels at government regulations that require paint cans to bear a label reading "Do not drink paint." He nominates Richard Nixon as Official U.S. Government Scapegoat. He commiserates with an Oklahoma mayor who must earn extra money by collecting beer cans and claiming the deposits. He reminisces about a White House that welcomed casual picnickers on its lawn. He forgives.

George Bush for passing out in Tokyo. He observes that "if we can put a man on the moon, we could put Congress in orbit." He skewers lawyers, bureaucrats, Washington insiders, hypocrites of all stripes. He commemorates absurdity - and hence suffers fools gladly.

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Linked Data


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