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Eve's herbs : a history of contraception and abortion in the West

Author: John M Riddle
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1997.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Eve's Herbs explores a new question: If women once had access to effective means of birth control, why was this knowledge lost to them in modern times?"--BOOK JACKET. "Beginning with the testimony of a young woman brought before the Inquisition in France in 1320, Riddle asks what women knew about regulating fertility with herbs and shows how the new intellectual, religious, and legal climate of the early modern  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Riddle, John M.
Eve's herbs.
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1997
(OCoLC)645686677
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John M Riddle
ISBN: 067427024X 9780674270244 0674270266 9780674270268
OCLC Number: 36126503
Description: 341 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Introduction: Roe v. Wade --
1. A Woman's Secret --
2. The Herbs Known to the Ancients --
3. Ancient and Medieval Beliefs --
4. From Womancraft to Witchcraft, 1200-1500 --
5. Witches and Apothecaries in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries --
6. The Broken Chain of Knowledge --
7. The Womb as Public Territory --
8. Eve's Herbs in Modern America.
Responsibility: John M. Riddle.

Abstract:

The question explored in this book is: if women once had access to effective means of birth control, why was this knowledge lost to them in modern times? The book examines the widespread knowledge of  Read more...

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Eve's Herbs is a highly informative presentation of the history of the use of plant products, such as ergot, as abortion agents. -- Thomas Szasz Washington Post Riddle examines the use of plants as Read more...

 
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schema:description"Introduction: Roe v. Wade -- 1. A Woman's Secret -- 2. The Herbs Known to the Ancients -- 3. Ancient and Medieval Beliefs -- 4. From Womancraft to Witchcraft, 1200-1500 -- 5. Witches and Apothecaries in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries -- 6. The Broken Chain of Knowledge -- 7. The Womb as Public Territory -- 8. Eve's Herbs in Modern America."@en
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schema:reviewBody""Eve's Herbs explores a new question: If women once had access to effective means of birth control, why was this knowledge lost to them in modern times?"--BOOK JACKET. "Beginning with the testimony of a young woman brought before the Inquisition in France in 1320, Riddle asks what women knew about regulating fertility with herbs and shows how the new intellectual, religious, and legal climate of the early modern period tended to cast suspicion on women who employed "secret knowledge" to terminate or prevent pregnancy. Knowledge of the menstrual-regulating qualities of rue, pennyroyal, and other herbs was widespread through succeeding centuries among herbalists, apothecaries, doctors, and laywomen themselves, even as theologians and legal scholars began advancing the idea that the fetus was fully human from the moment of conception."--BOOK JACKET. "Drawing on previously unavailable material, Riddle reaches a startling conclusion: while it did not persist in a form that was available to most women, ancient knowledge about herbs was not lost in modern times but survived in coded form. Persecuted as "witchcraft" in centuries past and prosecuted as a crime in our own time, the control of fertility by "Eve's herbs" has been practiced by women since ancient times."--Jacket."
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