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Evidences of the authenticity, inspiration, and canonical authority of the Holy Scriptures.

Author: Archibald Alexander; Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (Old School). Board of Publication.
Publisher: Philadelphia, Presbyterian board of publications [1836]
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 7th edView all editions and formats
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Alexander, Archibald, 1772-1851.
Evidences of the authenticity, inspiration, and canonical authority of the Holy Scriptures.
Philadelphia, Presbyterian board of publications [1836]
(OCoLC)551495226
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Archibald Alexander; Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (Old School). Board of Publication.
OCLC Number: 1117516
Notes: Running title: Evidences of Christianity.
Description: 308 pages 20 cm
Contents: Chapter I. The right use of reason in religion --
Chapter II. It is impossible to banish all religion from the world, and if it were possible, it would be the greatest calamity which could befall the human race --
Chapter III. If Christianity be rejected, there is no other religion which can be substituted in its place, at least no other which will at all answer the purpose for which religion is desirable --
Chapter IV. Revelation necessary to teach us how to worship God acceptably --
the nature and certainty of a future state --
and especially, the method by which sinners may obtain salvation --
Chapter V. There is nothing improbable or unreasonable in the idea of a revelation from God, and consequently nothing improbable or unreasonable in such a manifest divine interpretation, as may be necessary to establish a revelation --
Chapter VI. Miracles are capable of proof from testimony --
Chapter VII. The miracles of the Gospel are credible --
Chapter VIII. The rapid and extensive progress of the Gospel, by instruments so few and feeble, is a proof of divine interposition --
Chapter IX. Prophecies respecting the Jewish nation which have been remarkably fulfilled --
Chapter X. Prophecies relating to Nineveh, Babylon, Tyre --
Chapter XI. Prophecies respecting Messiah --
predictions of Christ respecting the destruction of Jerusalem --
Chapter XII. No other religion possesses the same kind and degree of evidence as Christianity: and no other miracles are as well attested as those recorded in the Bible --
Chapter XIII. The Bible contains internal evidence that is origin is divine --
Chapter XIV. The Scriptures of the Old and New Testament were written by the inspiration of God; and this inspiration, however it may be distinguished, was plenary; that is, the writers were under as infallible guidance, both as to ideas and words; and yet the acquired knowledge, habits, and peculiar dispositions, of the writers, were not superseded --
Chapter XV. The inspiration of the books of the New Testament --
Canonical authority of the books of Scripture --
Chapter XVI. The importance of ascertaining the true canon of Holy Scripture --
Chapter XVII. The care with which the books of the Old Testament were preserved --
their canonical authority --
the sanction given to these books by the Savior and his apostles --
and the method of ascertaining what books were in the canon at the time of Christ's advent --
Chapter XVIII. The books denominated apocryphal have no just claim to a place among the canonical Scriptures of the Old Testament --
Chapter XIX. Canon of the New Testament --
method of settling it --
testimony of the Church --
constitution of the canon --
whence these books derive their authority --
solicitude of early Christians to obtain these books --
their care to distinguish them from others --
autographs, etc --
Chapter XX. Testimonies in favour of the canonical authority of the books of the New Testament --
Chapter XXI. Canonical authority of Paul's epistles --
Chapter XXII. The canonical authority of the seven Catholic epistles, and of the book of Revelation --
Chapter XXIII. Recapitulation of evidence on the canon of the New Testament.
Other Titles: Evidences of Christianity.
Responsibility: By the Rev. Archibald Alexander ...

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