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The evolution of intelligence : are humans the only animals with minds?

Author: James H Fetzer
Publisher: Chicago : Open Court, ©2005.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Evolutionary theory and philosophy of mind come together in this carefully reasoned explanation of what is now known about humankind's place in nature. According to Professor James H. Fetzer, any scientific account of the evolution of mind must be based on a theoretically defensible conception of what mind is, clarifying the way in which mental states influence behavior. Fetzer disputes the computational  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: James H Fetzer
ISBN: 0812694597 9780812694598
OCLC Number: 60375451
Description: xx, 272 p. : ill., map ; 23 cm.
Contents: Biology and behavior --
Animal mentality --
The minds of primates --
Computers and cognition --
Gene-culture co-evolution --
What about intelligence? --
Evolution and rationality --
Ethics and evolution --
Biology and society.
Responsibility: James H. Fetzer.
More information:

Abstract:

"Evolutionary theory and philosophy of mind come together in this carefully reasoned explanation of what is now known about humankind's place in nature. According to Professor James H. Fetzer, any scientific account of the evolution of mind must be based on a theoretically defensible conception of what mind is, clarifying the way in which mental states influence behavior. Fetzer disputes the computational conception, currently the most fashionable within cognitive science, and propounds an alternative approach based on semiotics. Using gene-culture co-evolutionary theory, we can identify intelligence with epigenetic rules involving the use of signs. In this view, some machines may be credited with intelligence but not with minds." "Fetzer's wide-ranging discussion sheds light on many controversial issues, including the scientific status of sociobiology, variability in intelligence among human populations, and the relation between biological evolution and moral imperatives."--Jacket.

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