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Experiences in translation

Author: Umberto Eco; Alastair McEwen
Publisher: Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, ©2001.
Series: Toronto Italian studies.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Translation is not about comparing two languages, Umberto Eco argues, but about the interpretation of a text in two different languages." "In this book he draws on his substantial practical experience to identify and discuss some central problems of translation. As he demonstrates, a translation can express an evident deep sense of a text even when violating both lexical and referential faithfulness. Depicting  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Traductions
Named Person: Umberto Eco; Umberto Eco; Umberto Eco; Umberto Eco
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Umberto Eco; Alastair McEwen
ISBN: 0802035337 9780802035332 9780802096142 080209614X
OCLC Number: 45300350
Notes: Based on Goggio public lectures presented Oct. 7, 9, 13, 1998, at the Faculty of Information Studies, Univ. of Toronto.
Description: x, 135 pages ; 23 cm.
Contents: Partial content appears in author's later work entitled: "Dire quasi la stessa cosa: Esperienze di traduzione."
Series Title: Toronto Italian studies.
Responsibility: Umberto Eco ; translated by Alastair McEwen.
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In this book Umberto Eco argues that translation is not about comparing two languages, but about the interpretation of a text in two different languages, thus involving a shift between cultures.  Read more...

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"'Umberto Eco's Experiences in Translation is witty and engrossing, and it will inform and entertain readers who have ever wondered about the work that goes into transforming a text from a language Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""Translation is not about comparing two languages, Umberto Eco argues, but about the interpretation of a text in two different languages." "In this book he draws on his substantial practical experience to identify and discuss some central problems of translation. As he demonstrates, a translation can express an evident deep sense of a text even when violating both lexical and referential faithfulness. Depicting translation as a semiotic task, he uses a wide range of source materials as illustration: the translations of his own and other novels, translations of the dialogue of American films into Italian, and various versions of the Bible. In the second part of his study he deals with translation theories proposed by Jakobson, Steiner, Peirce, and others." "Overall, Eco identifies the different types of interpretive acts that count as translation. A new typology emerges, based on his insistence on a common-sense approach and the necessity of taking a critical stance."--BOOK JACKET."
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