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Explaining Criminal Careers: Implications for Justice Policy

Author: John F MacLeod; David P Farrington; Peter G Grove
Publisher: S.l. ; S.l. Oxford University Press 2012
Edition/Format:   Computer file : No Linguistic Content
Summary:
Explaining Criminal Careers presents a simple quantitative theory of crime, conviction and reconviction, the assumptions of the theory are derived directly from a detailed analysis of cohort samples drawn from the "UK Home Office" Offenders Index (OI). Mathematical models based on the theory, together with population trends, are used to make: exact quantitative predictions of features of criminal careers; aggregate  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: John F MacLeod; David P Farrington; Peter G Grove
ISBN: 9780199697243 0199697248
OCLC Number: 931793057
Description: Online-Ressource
Contents: Explaining Criminal Careers presents a simple quantitative theory of crime, conviction and reconviction, the assumptions of the theory are derived directly from a detailed analysis of cohort samples drawn from the "UK Home Office" Offenders Index (OI). Mathematical models based on the theory, together with population trends, are used to make: exact quantitative predictions of features of criminal careers; aggregate crime levels; the prison population; and to explain the age-crime curve, alternative explanations are shown not to be supported by the data. Previous research is reviewed, clearly identifying the foundations of the current work. Using graphical techniques to identify mathematical regularities in the data, recidivism (risk) and frequency (rate) of conviction are analysed and modelled. These models are brought together to identify three categories of offender: high-risk / high-rate, high-risk / low-rate and low-risk / low-rate. The theory is shown to rest on just 6 basic assumptions. Within this theoretical framework the seriousness of offending, specialisation or versatility in offence types and the psychological characteristics of offenders are all explored suggesting that the most serious offenders are a random sample from the risk/rate categories but that those with custody later in their careers are predominantly high-risk/high-rate. In general offenders are shown to be versatile rather than specialist and can be categorised using psychological profiles. The policy implications are drawn out highlighting the importance of conviction in desistance from crime and the absence of any additional deterrence effect of imprisonment. The use of the theory in evaluation of interventions is demonstrated.

Abstract:

Using the Home Office Offenders Index, a unique database containing records of all criminal (standard list) convictions in England and Wales since 1963, this simple but influential theory makes exact  Read more...

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The authors of iExplaining Criminal Careersr bring to play sound expertise in psychology, statistics and mathematical modelling and after examining the validity of existing criminal career theories, Read more...

 
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