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Exploring differences in employment between household and establishment data

Author: Katharine G Abraham; National Bureau of Economic Research.; et al
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : National Bureau of Economic Research, ©2009.
Series: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. 14805.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Using a large data set that links individual Current Population Survey (CPS) records to employer-reported administrative data, we document substantial discrepancies in basic measures of employment status that persist even after controlling for known definitional differences between the two data sources. We hypothesize that reporting discrepancies should be most prevalent for marginal workers and marginal jobs, and  Read more...
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Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Katharine G Abraham; National Bureau of Economic Research.; et al
OCLC Number: 316802952
Notes: "March 2009."
Description: 1 online resource (38, [12], 8 p.) : ill., digital.
Series Title: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. 14805.
Responsibility: Katharine G. Abraham ... [et al.].

Abstract:

Using a large data set that links individual Current Population Survey (CPS) records to employer-reported administrative data, we document substantial discrepancies in basic measures of employment status that persist even after controlling for known definitional differences between the two data sources. We hypothesize that reporting discrepancies should be most prevalent for marginal workers and marginal jobs, and find systematic associations between the incidence of reporting discrepancies and observable person and job characteristics that are consistent with this hypothesis. The paper discusses the implications of the reported findings for both micro and macro labor market analysis.

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