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Fables : in one volume complete

Author: John Gay
Publisher: Barre, Mass., Printed for the members of Imprint Society, 1970.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In 1711, one of the most popular literary forms in England was the fable. The fable may seem restricted to wise sayings and modern parodies, but authors wrote them to further their religious and literary causes and they also translated politics into a fabulous satirical menagerie. The fable, whatever its subject, was always didactic, and behind the wolves, foxes, rabbits, frogs, and bears was the moral. This  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John Gay
ISBN: 0876360029 9780876360026
OCLC Number: 92849
Description: xix, 234 pages 66 illustrations 28 cm
Contents: pt. 1: The shepard and the philosopher --
The lion, the tiger, and the traveller --
The spaniel and the cameleon --
The mother, the nurse, and the fairy --
The eagle, and the assembly of animals --
The wild boar and the ram --
The miser and the Plutus --
The lion, the fox, and the geese --
the lady and the wasp --
The bull and the mastiff --
The elephant and the bookseller --
The peacock, the turkey, and the goose --
Cupid, Hymen, and Plutus --
The tame stag --
The monkey who had seen the world --
The philosopher and the pheasants --
The pin and the needle --
the shepard's dog and the wolf --
The painter who pleased nobody and everybody --
The lion and the cub --
The old hen and the cock --
The rat-catcher and cats --
The goat without a beard --
The old woman and her cats --
The butterfly and the snail --
The scold and the parrot --
The cur and the mastiff --
The sick man and the angel --
The Persian, the sun, and the cloud --
The fox at the point of death --
The setting dog and the partridge --
The universal apparition --
The two owls and the sparrow --
The courtier and Proteus --
The mastiff --
the Barley-mow and the dunghill --
Pythagoras and the countryman --
The farmer's wife and the raven --
The turkey and the ant --
The father and Jupiter --
The two monkeys --
The owl and the farmer --
The jugglers --
The council of horses --
The hound and the huntsman --
The poet and the rose --
The cur, the horse, and the Shepard's dog --
The Court of Death --
The Gardner and the hog --
The man and the flea --
The hare and many friends. pt. 2: The dog and the fox --
The vulture, the sparrow, and other birds --
The baboon and the poultry --
The ant in office --
The bear in a boat --
The Squire and his cur --
The countryman and Jupiter --
The man, the cat, the dog, and the fly --
The jackall, leopard, and other beasts --
The degenerate bees --
The pack-horse and the carrier --
Pan and fortune --
Plutus, Cupid, and time --
The owl, the swan, the cock, the spider, the ass, and the farmer --
The cook-maid, the turnspit, and the ox --
The ravens, the Sexton, and the earth-worm.
Responsibility: by John Gay. With wood-engravings by Gillian Lewis Tyler.

Abstract:

In 1711, one of the most popular literary forms in England was the fable. The fable may seem restricted to wise sayings and modern parodies, but authors wrote them to further their religious and literary causes and they also translated politics into a fabulous satirical menagerie. The fable, whatever its subject, was always didactic, and behind the wolves, foxes, rabbits, frogs, and bears was the moral. This appealed to a public that found pleasure in finding instruction in its literature, and explains in part the continued popularity of the most successful collection of English fables, the series by John Gay. -- from Preface.

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schema:description"pt. 2: The dog and the fox -- The vulture, the sparrow, and other birds -- The baboon and the poultry -- The ant in office -- The bear in a boat -- The Squire and his cur -- The countryman and Jupiter -- The man, the cat, the dog, and the fly -- The jackall, leopard, and other beasts -- The degenerate bees -- The pack-horse and the carrier -- Pan and fortune -- Plutus, Cupid, and time -- The owl, the swan, the cock, the spider, the ass, and the farmer -- The cook-maid, the turnspit, and the ox -- The ravens, the Sexton, and the earth-worm."@en
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