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Facility manager's operation and manintenance handbook

Author: Bernnard T Lewis
Publisher: New York : McGraw-Hill, ©1999.
Series: McGraw-Hill handbooks.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Let 21 top specialists show you how to maximize the operation and maintenance capabilities of any facility or plant. This practical handbook takes you through each step in the planning, design, and execution of maintenance and operation procedures for structures, equipment, and systems. It features special emphasis on emergency and energy equipment used in facilities--and explores all essential support functions and  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Bernnard T Lewis
ISBN: 0070400482 9780070400481
OCLC Number: 39398787
Description: 1 volume (various pagings) : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Contents: Foreword Preface Contributors Part I: Organizing for Maintenance Operations Chapter 1-Program Organizational Structure 1.1 Responsibilities and Authority 1.2 The Facility Manager 1.3 Facility Planning 1.4 Facility Engineering and Design 1.4.1 Modification or Major Repairs 1.5 Engineering Support to the Maintenance and Operations Functions 1.5.1 Specialized Technical Services 1.5.2 Cost Reduction 1.6 Construction of Facilities and Installation of Equipment and Systems 1.6.1 Personnel in Facility Organizations-Single Project Worker-Hour Limit 1.7 Maintenance of Facilities and Systems Equipment 1.8 Preventive Maintenance 1.9 Routine Maintenance 1.10 Major Repairs 1.11 Alterations and Improvements 1.12 Housekeeping 1.13 Principles of Organization 1.13.1 Definition and Scope 1.14 Facilities Management Defined 1.14.1 Facility Management Functions 1.14.2 Organizational Prerequisites 1.15 Analyzing the Needs 1.16 Establishing Goals and Objectives 1.17 Administering the Organization 1.18 Organization vs. People 1.19 Using Titles 1.20 Performance Measurement 1.21 Organizing Considerations for Outsourcing Functions Chapter 2-Program Operations 2.1 Designing the Maintenance Management Information System 2.1.1 What Kind of Information Do You Need? 2.1.2 Common Information Needs 2.1.3 Special Information Needs 2.1.4 Hardware and Software Requirements 2.2 Functions of the System 2.2.1 Maintenance Planning and Scheduling 2.2.2 Corrective Maintenance 2.2.3 "House Calls" 2.2.4 Projects 2.2.5 Parts Availability 2.2.6 Information System Integration 2.2.7 Use of Preventive and Predictive Information 2.2.8 Warranties Information 2.2.9 Production and Financial Support 2.2.10 Personnel Data 2.2.11 Quality Control and Quality Assurance Data 2.3 Annual Maintenance Operational Report 2.3.1 Elements of a Successful System 2.3.2 Maintenance History vs. Machinery History 2.3.3 Production and Financial Reporting 2.3.4 Quality Management Impact 2.3.5 Maintenance "Outplanning" 2.4 Maintenance Management Manual 2.4.1 Scope of the Manual 2.4.2 Maintenance Objective 2.4.3 Lines of Authority 2.4.4 Task Responsibility 2.4.5 Corrective Action 2.4.6 Regular Review of Feedback 2.4.7 Document Control 2.4.8 Regular Review of Entire System 2.5 Other Considerations Part II: Facility Operations and Maintenance Plans Chapter 3-Operations Plans 3.1 Management Operational Plan 3.1.1 Work Control Methods and Procedures 3.1.2 Work Control Center 3.1.3 Service Orders (SO) 3.1.4 Work Orders (WO) 3.1.5 Standing Operating Orders (SOO) 3.1.6 Preventive Maintenance (PM) 3.1.7 Work Priority System 3.1.8 Emergency Priority 3.1.9 Urgent Priority 3.1.10 Routine Priority 3.1.11 Work Approval 3.1.12 Planning 3.1.13 Scheduling 3.1.14 Execution of Work 3.1.15 Checked and Inspected 3.1.16 Closed and Cost Accounted 3.1.17 Results Recorded, Analyzed, and Measured 3.1.18 Feedback 3.2 Building Operational Plan 3.2.1 Scheduling Work 3.2.2 Shutdowns and Startups 3.2.3 Emergency Situations 3.2.4 Trouble Diagnosis and Coordination 3.2.5 Coordination with Third Parties 3.2.6 Benchmarking 3.2.7 Statistical Process Control 3.3 Comprehensive Facility Operational Plans 3.3.1 Emergency Response Plan 3.3.2 Hazardous Materials Plan 3.3.3 Refrigerant Management 3.3.4 Safety Plans 3.3.5 Fire Protection Plans 3.3.6 Labor Unrest 3.4 Facility Occupant Support Plan 3.4.1 Improving Perceptions 3.4.2 Determining Wants 3.4.3 Provide Feedback 3.5 Quality Control Plan 3.5.1 Specific QCP Objectives 3.5.2 Inspection System 3.5.3 Inspections by FD Personnel 3.5.4 Identifying and Tracking Substandard Performance 3.5.5 Correcting Deficiencies 3.5.6 Total Quality Management (TQM) Program Specifically for O&M Procedures 3.5.7 Tenant Relations Program 3.5.8 Tenant Visit Report 3.6 Summary Chapter 4-Maintenance Plans 4.1 Equipment, Systems, and Structure Building Tours 4.1.1 Introduction 4.1.2 Purpose 4.1.3 Implementation 4.1.4 Scheduling 4.1.5 Equipment and System Logs 4.1.6 Technology 4.1.7 Staffing 4.1.8 Documentation 4.1.9 Summary 4.2 Engineered Performance Standards (EPS) Usage Plan 4.2.1 Basis for All Types of Labor Time Standards (EPS) 4.2.2 Computerization 4.2.3 Why Have Labor Time Standards? 4.2.4 Types of EPS 4.2.5 Estimate 4.2.6 Historical Work Standards 4.2.7 Direct Observed Standards 4.2.8 Published Engineered Performance Standards 4.2.9 Engineered Performance Standards 4.2.10 Management Manuals 4.2.11 Trades Manuals 4.2.12 General Services Administration: Public Buildings, Maintenance Guides and Time Standards 4.2.13 R.S. Means Maintenance Standards 4.2.14 How to Use Standards, a Step-by-Step Guide Chapter 5-Preventive Maintenance (PM) Plan 5.1 PM Procedures 5.1.1 Dollars and Cents 5.2 Automated Program-Software 5.2.1 Getting Started with CMMS 5.2.2 Flexibility and User-Friendliness 5.2.3 Generic CMMS Function 5.2.4 Implementing a CMMS 5.3 Maintenance File Cards 5.4 Equipment History Files 5.5 Verifying Facility Inventory 5.6 Labeling Facility Equipment 5.7 Annual PM Schedule 5.8 Setting Special Schedules 5.9 Opening or Dismantling Equipment 5.10 Computerized Records and Reporting Chapter 6-Predictive Maintenance Plan 6.1 Benefits of Predictive Maintenance 6.2 Predictive Maintenance Technologies 6.2.1 Vibration Monitoring 6.2.2 Infrared (IR) Thermography 6.2.3 Oil Analysis 6.2.4 Ultrasound 6.2.5 Integration 6.2.6 Expert Systems 6.3 Predictive Process 6.3.1 Program Startup 6.3.2 Measure Program Effectiveness 6.3.3 review and Revise Program Chapter 7-Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Plan 7.1 IAQ and the Contemporary Facility Manager 7.1.1 Indoor Pollutants 7.1.2 Sick Building Syndrome 7.1.3 Causes and Considerations 7.1.4 Facility Managers Go Proactive 7.2 The Proactive Facility Inspection and Sampling Techniques 7.2.1 Objectives 7.2.2 Scope of Proactive Facility Inspection 7.2.3 Analysis of Building Data 7.2.4 HVAC Inspection 7.2.5 Air Quality Tests 7.2.6 Outdoor Air 7.2.7 Water Quality Testing (Associated with HVAC Systems) 7.2.8 Drinking Water Sampling and Analysis 7.2.9 Other Tests 7.2.10 Facility Inspection Reports 7.2.11 Facility Reinspections 7.3 Avoidance Procedures 7.3.1 Preventive Operations, Maintenance, and Policy 7.3.2 Designing Healthy Buildings 7.3.3 Managing IAQ Risk within Leases Chapter 8-Technical Improvements Plan 8.1 Total Quality Management (TQM) Program 8.1.1 TQM-What It Is 8.1.2 TQM-What It Is Not 8.1.3 Rewards to Be Reaped 8.1.4 How Does TQM Work? 8.1.5 Summary: What to Do to Keep TQM on Track 8.2 Walue Improvement Program 8.2.1 Validation of Value 8.2.2 Value Engineering 8.2.3 Synergistic Opportunities 8.2.4 Successful Value Engineering 8.2.5 Increase Value 8.2.6 Value Perceptions 8.2.7 Why Does Poor Value Occur? 8.2.8 Value Engineering Process 8.3 Energy Management Program 8.3.1 Overview 8.3.2 Mechanical Systems 8.3.3 Control Systems 8.3.4 Energy Management Programs 8.3.5 Chiller Plant 8.3.6 Hot Water Reset 8.3.7 Lighting Controls 8.3.8 Conclusions Part III: Equipment and Systems Operations and Maintenance Procedures Chapter 9-Equipment and Systems Operations Procedures 9.1 Equipment Inventory 9.1.1 Conditions Assessment 9.1.2 Design Assessment 9.2 Operational Requirements 9.2.1 Equipment Startup and Shutdown 9.2.2 Operational Checks 9.2.3 Lighting 9.2.4 Relamping 9.2.5 Energy Conservation 9.2.6 Use of Demand Control Ventilation 9.3 Facility Management Tools 9.3.1 Energy Management Control System (EMCS)Operations 9.3.2 Emergency and Extended FMS Operations 9.3.3 FMS Service Program 9.3.4 FMS Operating Personnel Requirements 9.3.5 Remote Control Operating Requirements Chapter 10-Mechanical Equipment and Systems Maintenance Procedures 10.1 Preventive Maintenance Program 10.1.1 Purpose of PM 10.1.2 Practice of PM 10.1.3 Size of PM Activity 10.1.4 Definition of PM 10.1.5 Efficiency of PM 10.1.6 Engineering Input 10.1.7 Analysis of Maintenance Needs 10.1.8 Proper Use of Equipment 10.1.9 Basic Controls 10.1.10 Field Inspection Procedures 10.1.11 Feedback, Properly Supplied and Utilized 10.1.12 Labor Standards Applied to PM 10.1.13 How PM Relates to Other Routine Maintenance 10.1.14 Additional PM Program Techniques 10.2 Facilities Inspection and Maintenance Program 10.2.1 Computers 10.2.2 Reduction in Overall Maintenance Effort 10.2.3 Doing Only What Needs to Be Done 10.2.4 Plan Some Maintenance and Fire Fight the Remainder 10.2.5 Facilities Inspection and Maintenance Program Specifics 10.3 Equipment and Systems Maintenance and Repair Procedures 1 0.3.1 Preventive Maintenance Job Tasks 10.3.2 Publications 10.3.3 Personnel Requirements 10.4 Energy Management Control System (EMCS) 10.5 Equipment and System Warranties Chapter 11-Electrical Equipment and System Maintenance Procedures 11.1 Introduction 11.2 Electrical Safety 11.3 Insulation Resistance Measurements 11.4 Winding Turns Ratio Measurements 11.5 Power Factor and Dielectric-loss Measurements 11.5.1 Dielectric Loss 11.5.2 Power Factor 11.6 Motion Analysis of Circuit Breakers 11.7 Insulation and Insulators, General 11.8 Insulating Liquids 11.8.1 Sampling 11.8.2 Sample Containers 11.8.3 Sampling Location 11.8.4 Sampling Procedures 11.8.5 Periodic Tests 11.9 Switchgear 11.9.1 Maintenance 11.9.2 Tests 11.10 Protective Relays 11.10.1 General 11.10.2 Construction 11.10.3 Types and Device Numbers 11.10.4 Maintenance 11.10.5 Tests 11.10.6 Cautions 11.11 Ground Fault Protection 11.11.1 Electrical Tests 11.12 Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI) 11.13 Low-Voltage Molded (Insulated)Case Circuit Breakers 11.13.1 Electrical Tests, Energized and Carrying Load 11.13.2 Electrical Tests, Deenergized 11.14 Low-Voltage Air Circuit Breakers 11.14.1 Maintenance 11.14.2 Tests 11.15 Medium Voltage Breakers 11.15.1 Air Breakers 11.15.2 Maintenance 11.15.3 Tests 11.15.4 Vacuum Breakers 11.15.5 Maintenance 11.15.6 Tests 11.15.7 Oil Breakers 11.15.8 Maintenance 11.15.9 Tests 11.16 Switches 11.16.1 Maintenance 11.16.2 Tests 11.17 Fuses 11.17.1 Maintenance 11.17.2 Tests 11.18 Motor Control Centers and Starters 11.18.1 Maintenance, Low-Voltage Units 11.18.2 Tests, Low-Voltage Units 11.18.3 Maintenance, Medium-Voltage Units 11.18.4 Maintenance, Medium-Voltage Units 11.19 Batteries and Battery Chargers 11.19.1 Batteries 11.19.2 Battery Chargers 11.19.3 Maintenance of Batteries 11.19.4 Tests 11.19.5 Maintenance of Chargers 11.19.6 Tests 11.19.7 Cautions 11.20 Transformers 11.20.1 Power and Distribution Transformers 11.20.2 Instrument Transformers 11.20.3 Specialty Transformers 11.20.4 Control Transformers 11.20.5 Construction 11.20.6 Dry-Type Transformers 11.20.7 Liquid-Filled Transformers 11.20.8 Transformer Insulating Liquids 11.20.9 Mineral Oil 11.20.10 Askarel (PCBs) 11.20.11 R-Temp 11.20.12 Silicone 11.20.13 Perchloroethylene 11.20.14 Transformer Appurtenances 11.20.15 Maintenance, Dry-Type Transformers, As Applicable 11.20.16 tests of Dry-Type Transformers 11.20.17 Maintenance of Liquid-Filled Transformers 11.20.18 Tests for Liquid-Filled Transformers 11.21 Voltage-Regulating Apparatus 11.21.1 Step Voltage Regulators and Load Tap Chargers (LTC) 11.21.2 Induction-Type Voltage Regulators 11.21.3 Voltage-Regulating Relay System 11.21.4 Maintenance 11.21.5 Electrical Tests 11.22 Cable and Wire 11.22.1 Maintenance 11.22.2 Tests 11.23 Rotating Machines 11.23.1 Introduction 11.23.2 Safety 11.23.3 Maintenance 11.23.4 Commutator, Slip Rings, and Brush Maintenance 11.23.5 Alignment 11.23.6 Air Gap Measurement 11.23.7 Grounding Straps 11.23.8 Tests 11.23.9 Synchronous Motor Tests 11.24 Surge Arresters 11.24.1 Maintenance 11.24.2 Tests 11.25 Grounding Systems and Equipment Grounding 11.25.1 Grounding Systems 11.25.2 Equipment Grounding 11.25.3 Maintenance 11.25.4 Tests 11.25.5 Frequency of Performance 11.25.6 Personnel Qualifications 11.25.7 Tables of Values Chapter 12-Outsourcing Considerations 12.1 Recommended Tasks for Questioning 12.2 Other Considerations 12.2.1 Can You Motivate Contract Maintenance Workers? 12.3 The Advantages and Disadvantages of Outsourcing 12.3.1 Advantages 12.3.2 The Disadvantages of Outsourcing 12.4 Contract Services 12.5 Quality 12.6 Flexibility 12.7 Reduced Capital Expenditures 12.8 Employing Specialty Contractors 12.9 Selecting an Outsouring Source 12.10 Judging Abilities of an Outsourcing Firm 12.11 Responsibility of Outsource Firm Administration and Control 12.12 Outsource Contract Administration 12.12.1 Negotiating the Outsource Contract 12.12.2 Specification of Services: Responsibility for Communications, Supplies, Materials, Equipment, and Utilities 12.12.3 Certified Outsource Firm Personnel to Be Used 12.12.4 Scheduling Work and/or Reporting Requirement 12.12.5 Supervision of Contractual Execution 12.12.6 Conclusion Chapter 13-General Cleaning in Today's Modern Facility Environment 13.1 General 13.2 Types of Cleaning 13.3 Cleaning Program 13.4 Staffing 13.5 Job Descriptions 13.6 Quality Control 13.7 Waste Management Program Chapter 14-Landscaping Services 14.1 General Responsibilities of the Contractor 14.2 Selecing a Contractor and the Bidding Process 14.3 Lawn Maintenance 14.3.1 Mowing and Trimming 14.3.2 Weed Control and Pests 14.3.3 Fertilization 14.3.4 Dethatching and Aeration 14.3.5 Overseeding 14.4 Maintenance of Trees, Shrubs, and Other Plantings 14.4.1 Mulch and Weed Control 14.4.2 Pruning 14.4.3 Fertilization 14.4.4 Cleanup Chapter 15-Elevator and Escalator Equipment and Systems Maintenance and Repair Services 15.1 Introducion 15.2 Operating Instructions 15.2.1 Elevators 15.2.2 Freight Elevators 15.2.3 Hand Elevators 15.2.4 Hand-Operated Dumbwaiters 15.2.5 Hand- and Power-Operated Dumbwaiters 15.2.6 Wheelchair Lifts 15.2.7 Escalators and Moving Walks 15.2.8 ADA Signage (American Disabilities Act) 15.2.9 Additional Signage 15.2.10 Equipment Identification Signs 15.3 Maintenance of Equipment 15.3.1 Definitions and Terminology 15.3.2 Contracted Maintenance 15.3.3 In-House Maintenance 15.3.4 Removing Equipment from Service 15.4 Monitoring Equipment Performance 15.4.1 What to Monitor 15.4.2 Callback and Downtime Performance 15.5 Monitoring Maintenance Performance 15.6 Improving Safety and Limiting Liability 15.7 Modernization of Equipment 15.7.1 Why, When, and What to Modernize 15.7.2 How to Select a Modernization Contractor Chapter 16-Water Treatment Services 16.1 Facility Water Systems 16.1.1 Air-Conditioning Systems 16.1.2 Heating Systems 16.1.3 Humidification Systems 16.1.4 Potable Water Systems 16.1.5 Principles of Water Treatment 16.2 Obtaining Water Treatment Services 16.2.1 Contracted Services vs. In-House Water Treatment 16.2.2 Full-Service Water Treatment 16.2.3 Support Service Water Treatment 16.2.4 The Role of Consultants in Contracted Water Treatment Services 16.3 Installing a New Water Treatment Program 16.3.1 Selecting a Water Treatment Vendor 16.3.2 Water Treatment Specifications 16.4 Managing a Facility Water Treatment Program 16.4.1 Service Programs 16.4.2 Evaluating Water Treatment Program Performance 16.4.3 Cleaning Water System Equipment and Piping Chapter 17-Architectural, Structural, and Sustaining Maintenance and Repair for Structures 17.1 Introduction 17.2 Information for Maintenance and Repair Systems and Work Control 17.3 Human Resources 17.4 Customer and Occupant Interaction 17.5 Scheduling 17.6 Work Documentation 17.7 Safety 17.8 Planning and Estimating 17.9 Quality Control and Customer Satisfaction Appendix: Supplementary Practices and Procedures Preliminary Practices Identifying Problem Areas Organizational Plans Management by Objectives Training Staff Development Model of Administrative Action Needed to Set Goals for Optimum Personnel Utilization Materials Management Parts, Supplies, and Materials-Storage, Location, and Distribution Relationship with Purchasing Budgets and Costs Identification, Preparation, and Administration of the Facility Department Budget Capital Investment Analysis Safeguarding the Facility Applied Biology Corrosion Protection Operations Research-Techniques Glossary Index
Series Title: McGraw-Hill handbooks.
Responsibility: Bernard T. Lewis.
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Presents techniques that can boost the productivity and slash the costs of your facility department. This work show you how to maximize the operation and maintenance capabilities of your facility or  Read more...

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