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Farce

Author: Jessica Milner Davis
Publisher: New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction, ©2003.
Series: Classics in communication and mass culture series.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : [Updated ed.]View all editions and formats
Summary:
"Farce has always been relegated to the lowest rung of the ladder of dramatic genres. Distinctions between farce and more literary comic forms remain clouded, even in the light of contemporary efforts to rehabilitate this type of comedy. Is farce really nothing more than slapstick - the "putting out of candles, kicking down of tables, falling over joynt-stools," as Thomas Shadwell characterized it in the seventeenth  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jessica Milner Davis
ISBN: 0765808870 9780765808875
OCLC Number: 50242993
Notes: Originally published: London : Methuen, 1978.
Description: xi, 191 pages ; 23 cm.
Contents: What is farce? --
The world of rebellion --
Tit-for-tat, the world of revenge --
The world of coincidence --
On the borderine.
Series Title: Classics in communication and mass culture series.
Responsibility: Jessica Milner Davis ; with a new introduction by the author.

Abstract:

A study of the importance of farce, guiding the reader through the history of the European theatre. The emphasis is on the discussion of actual farce texts, which range from Plautus to Stoppard, from  Read more...

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Farce is a welcome and uniquely recommended contribution to both Literary Criticism and Culture Studies reference collections and supplementary reading lists.- --Library Bookwatch Farce is a welcome Read more...

 
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    schema:reviewBody ""Farce has always been relegated to the lowest rung of the ladder of dramatic genres. Distinctions between farce and more literary comic forms remain clouded, even in the light of contemporary efforts to rehabilitate this type of comedy. Is farce really nothing more than slapstick - the "putting out of candles, kicking down of tables, falling over joynt-stools," as Thomas Shadwell characterized it in the seventeenth century? Or was his contemporary, Nahum Tate correct when he declared triumphantly that "there are no rules to be prescribed for that sort of wit, no patterns to copy; and 'tis altogether the creature of imagination"? Jessica Milner Davis shows farce to be an essential component in both the comedic and tragic traditions." "Farce sets out to explore the territory of what makes farce distinct as a comic genre. Its lowly origins date back to the classic Graeco-Roman theatre; but when formal drama was reborn by the process of elaboration of ritual within the mediaeval Church, the French term "farce" became synonymous with a recognizable style of comic performance. Taking a wide range of farces from the briefest and most basic of fair-ground mountebank performances to fully-fledged five-act structures from the late nineteenth century, the book reveals the patterns of comic plot and counter-plot that are common to all."--BOOK JACKET." ;
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