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Farming by the book : British georgic in prose and practice, 1697-1820

Author: Laura Browne Sayre
Publisher: 2002.
Dissertation: Thesis (Ph. D.)--Princeton University, 2002.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Cultural materialist study of the Virgilian roots of eighteenth-century agricultural "improvement". Argues that the British agricultural revolution was not just a matter of new tools and crops, but also a problem of reading and writing, its advocates consciously struggling to transfer a universe of traditional practice into a coherent body of written authority. Part I examines how the tropes of Virgilian georgic  Read more...
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Details

Named Person: Virgil.
Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript
Document Type: Book, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Laura Browne Sayre
OCLC Number: 57512020
Reproduction Notes: Photocopy. Ann Arbor, Mich. : University Microfilms International, 2002. 24 cm (ix, 493 leaves).
Description: 2 v. : ill., maps ; 29 cm.
Contents: pt. I. Of tillage and translation: British georgic in practice : ch. 1. Reading and writing the literature of agricultural improvement --
ch. 2. Cultivating Virgil: Jethro Tull and the new husbandry --
ch. 3. Agriculture in the garden: From the ferme ornée to the model farm --
pt. II. Mixed economies, mixed genres: British georgic in prose : ch. 4. Improving the novel: managing ladies in Richardson and Scott --
ch. 5. Novel enthusiasms: farming gentlemen in Smollett and Graves --
ch. 6. "A compleat account of Great Britain": georgic and the agricultural tour --
Afterword: The disapperance of the georgic.
Responsibility: Laura Browne Sayre.

Abstract:

Cultural materialist study of the Virgilian roots of eighteenth-century agricultural "improvement". Argues that the British agricultural revolution was not just a matter of new tools and crops, but also a problem of reading and writing, its advocates consciously struggling to transfer a universe of traditional practice into a coherent body of written authority. Part I examines how the tropes of Virgilian georgic (The Georgics by Virgil being a four-book poem describing how to farm) were translated into directions for land management. Part II evaluates how georgic attitudes were explored in two increasingly successful prose formats, the novel and the tour.

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