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Fault lines : race, work, and the politics of changing Australia

Author: George Megalogenis
Publisher: Melbourne : Scribe Publications, 2003.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In Faultlines, journalist George Megalogenis explores the seemingly contradictory tendencies in the nation's political and cultural make up. How can Australia be both open and closed? Why are we pro immigration, yet unsympathetic to asylum-seekers? Why is it that the majority of workers in our globally connected economy are women, yet the senior levels of government, media, and business remain dominated by men?"  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: George Megalogenis
ISBN: 1920769056 9781920769055
OCLC Number: 54690702
Description: vii, 215 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Responsibility: George Megalogenis.

Abstract:

"In Faultlines, journalist George Megalogenis explores the seemingly contradictory tendencies in the nation's political and cultural make up. How can Australia be both open and closed? Why are we pro immigration, yet unsympathetic to asylum-seekers? Why is it that the majority of workers in our globally connected economy are women, yet the senior levels of government, media, and business remain dominated by men?" "Using a wide range of data from the most recent census, and secret race polling conducted by the major political parties, Megalogenis investigates the faultlines of gender, race, and work which divide the nation - as well as issues raised by conflicts between the new economy and the old, the city and the bush, and the inner city and the rest. He identifies an emerging generation - Generation W - that is forming a 'wobbly bridge' between old and new Australia."--BOOK JACKET.

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