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Feeling wronged leads to entitlement and selfishness

Author: Emily Maria Zitek; Benoît Monin; Carol S Dweck; Elizabeth Mullen; Stanford University. Department of Psychology.
Publisher: 2010.
Dissertation: Thesis (Ph. D.)--Stanford University, 2010.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Document : Thesis/dissertation : eBook   Computer File : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Five studies demonstrate that feeling wronged leads to a sense of entitlement and to selfish behavior. In Study 1, participants who were instructed to recall a time when their lives were unfair were more likely to refuse to help the experimenter with a supplementary task than were participants who recalled a time when they were bored. In Study 2, the same manipulation increased intentions to engage in a number of  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Document, Thesis/dissertation, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Emily Maria Zitek; Benoît Monin; Carol S Dweck; Elizabeth Mullen; Stanford University. Department of Psychology.
OCLC Number: 650761941
Notes: Submitted to the Department of Psychology.
Description: 1 online resource.
Responsibility: Emily Maria Zitek.

Abstract:

Five studies demonstrate that feeling wronged leads to a sense of entitlement and to selfish behavior. In Study 1, participants who were instructed to recall a time when their lives were unfair were more likely to refuse to help the experimenter with a supplementary task than were participants who recalled a time when they were bored. In Study 2, the same manipulation increased intentions to engage in a number of selfish behaviors, and this effect was mediated by self-reported entitlement to obtain positive (and avoid negative) outcomes. In Study 3, participants who lost a computer game for an unfair reason (a glitch in the program) requested a more selfish money allocation for a future task than did participants who lost the game for a fair reason, and this effect was again mediated by entitlement. In Studies 4 and 5, bad luck from a fair, random system led to the same kinds of effects for men. In Study 4, students (especially men) who received bad numbers in a housing lottery expressed less intention to behave charitably. In Study 5, men who were assigned to bad outcomes by the roll of a die were less willing to help out by signing up for an additional experiment than were men in the control condition, and self-reported entitlement again mediated the effect.

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Linked Data


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